Be Smart. Plan Ahead. Designate A Driver Seafair Weekend.

City of Seattle encourages safe travel on land and water and hopes everyone gets safely to and from wherever the weekend takes them.  Here is a link to Seafair’s page on transportation options and parking for Seafair Weekend.

seafairweekend(2)(1)With this upcoming weekend’s Seafair Weekend events, the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) and Seattle Police Department (SPD) would like to remind everyone to plan ahead before heading out to enjoy Seafair activities. That includes minding your speed, watching for out for other people, and designating a driver, behind the wheel of a car or boat, to keep our roads and waterways safe for all. The reminder is part of Vision Zero – Seattle’s plan to end traffic deaths and fatalities by 2030.

The city has seen an increase in total crashes, injuries and distracted-related collisions during Seafair weekend on roads near Seafair Weekend events.

Seafair is one of the busiest boating events of the season. Drinking and operating a boat is subject to the same DUI laws as operating a motor vehicle, and SPD’s Harbor Patrol actively enforces these laws. Extra enforcement patrols will also be on land, given the festivities extend from the water to public parks and streets.

The City of Seattle is committed to safe travel and to eliminating traffic-related deaths and serious injuries. Earlier this year, the City launched Vision Zero to design smarter streets, enforce existing laws, and educate the public on safe travel behavior.

Vizion Zero

Have a Safe and Fun Weekend! For more information on Vision Zero, visit www.seattle.gov/visionzero.

Traveling in Rainier Valley is About to Become Safer and Easier

Want to help make Rainier Valley a safer and more mobile place to live and work? Join SDOT at our open house on July 30 from 7-9 pm to learn about the projects improving the way people live and travel.

The meeting will be held at the Rainier Community Center on 4600 38th Avenue South. Interpreters in Cambodian, Vietnamese, Tagalog, Somali, Amharic, Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese and Oromo will be present, along with treats and child care.

At the open house, we’ll share updates on current projects and the results of intensive data collection and public input on how to make Rainier Avenue South operate more safely for all travelers. We will also facilitate questions and field answers and comments to reflect the priorities of the Rainier Valley community.

RansportinRainierValley

Click to Enhance

With the help of the public’s feedback and use of data we are taking steps to achieve Seattle’s Vision Zero goal of eliminating traffic deaths and serious injuries. Working in Rainier Valley is one way we hope to improve the lives of all who value this neighborhood. Once completed, these projects will make it easier and safer for people to walk, bike, ride transit and drive in the area.

Key projects that we will discuss include:

Rainier Valley North-South Neighborhood Greenway

We’re excited to unveil the most promising route for this neighborhood greenway Construction is scheduled to begin in 2016. The greenway extends six miles from Rainier Beach to the I-90 trail through a series of streets with slower posted speed limits. This route provides additional connections to existing greenways and one under construction. It will also create a bicyclist and pedestrian friendly solution to community destinations such as parks, schools and stores. . Check out a map of the route and recommended safety improvements on our project page: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/rainiervalleygreenways2.htm

Accessible Mt. Baker

This project is currently studies ways to implement safety improvements for those using the Link light rail station and traveling through the Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Rainier Avenue South intersection. The project encompasses a long-term multimodal approach that is consistent with the North Rainier Neighborhood Plan. Some of the proposals under consideration include restoring historic boulevard connections, creating additional links to parks and recreational areas, as well as maintaining unique cultural and community elements. For more information: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/accessibleMtBaker.htm

Rainier Avenue South Road Safety Corridor

Once this project is built, people who travel along this busy street will notice safety enhancements and increased traffic predictability. Using tools like retimed traffic signals and pedestrian enhancements will help us address current behavioral issues like people speeding, or driving distracted. The project limits extend along Rainier Ave S from Charlestown St to Seward Park Ave S with construction planned for this year. For more information: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/rainieraves.htm

An open house meeting for the Rainier Avenue South Road Safety Corridor in February 2014

An open house meeting for the Rainier Avenue South Road Safety Corridor in February 2014

We hope to see you there!

 

How the S Hinds Street Stairway improves biking connections

Biking between Rainier Valley and Lake Washington is now a lot easier thanks to the new bicycle “runnel” built by SDOT crews at S. Hinds Street and York Road S. stairway. Stairway runnels create an easier way for bicyclists to push bikes up or down a staircase in a channel (like a concrete rain gutter) on the side of the staircase. This can save bicyclists injury from slinging their bike over their shoulder to climb stairs. The new stairway runnel (as seen on the left side of the photo) features a handrail for the runnel user, which also delineates the space for pedestrians.

S. Hinds Street stairway: before (left) and after (right)

S. Hinds Street stairway: before (left) and after (right)

These improvements are part of SDOT’s Stairway Maintenance and Repair Program. The S. Hinds Street stairway is one of more than 500 stairways owned and maintained by SDOT’s Roadway Structures Division. Learn more about SDOT’s stairways and upcoming repair projects by visiting http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/stairways.htm.

Keeping Pedestrians Safe in Ballard at NW 65th Street and 18th Avenue NW

Early in 2015 SDOT completed another innovative project to improve pedestrian safety near the Salmon Bay School at NW 65th Street and 18th Avenue NW in Ballard. This project is another effort to help us achieve our Vision Zero goal, to end traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2030. .

New Curb ramps and RRFB at NW 65th and 18 Ave NW near Salmon Bay Elementary

New Curb ramps and RRFB at NW 65th and 18 Ave NW near Salmon Bay Elementary

The work at this intersection involved new curb ramps, curb bulbs, sidewalks repairs, and finally solar-powered Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacons (RRFB), signals that help pedestrians cross streets safely. An on-street bicycle corral was also installed adjacent to the school.

65th St at 18 ave

This project improves pedestrian, vehicle, and road sign visibility, thereby increasing awareness of pedestrians, vehicles, and bicyclists to one another. The solar-powered RRFBs are a sustainable yet environmentally friendly alternative. This approach to provide power to the crossing beacons is helping ensure the longevity and reliability of the signals for years at a lower cost.

 

This intersection improvement was funded by Seattle’s Safe Routes to School program. To learn more about this and other Safe Routes to School projects, please click here.

Join us at the Center City Bike Network Open House tonight!

Please join us tonight for the Center City Bike Network open house to meet the project team and share your vision for the project.

Tuesday, July 21, Town Hall Seattle at 1119 8th Ave from 5:00 – 7:00 PM

  • Learn the history and next steps in the selection and design process
  • Share specific input as well as your vision for a more vibrant city and safer traveling experience for people walking, biking and driving downtown
  • We’ll have activities for kids too!

The Seattle Department of Transportation is studying and prioritizing locations for a protected bicycle lane network in downtown Seattle. This work builds on outreach and data collected as part of Seattle’s 2014 Bicycle Master Plan. SDOT plans to implement the Center City Bike Network of protected bike lanes by 2020, pending funding availability.

ccb2015_0701_project_map

Why Protected Bike Lanes?

U.S. cities are increasingly embracing protected bike lanes that separate people on bikes from people in cars by using physical barriers such as posts, parked cars or simple landscaping.
Seattle’s downtown network of protected bike lanes aims to:

  • Improve safety and predictability by separating all modes of travel
  • Expand connectivity throughout downtown and the rest of Seattle as our city continues to grow
  • Boost business by offering more travel options for getting to them
  • Promote physical activity and increase ridership by supporting people of all ages and abilities
  • Provide affordable travel options

 

Design that Builds on Best Practices

Like all good transportation systems, protected bike lanes require smart investments and careful planning. SDOT will use a combination of technical analysis, ongoing public input and coordination with projects such as the Center City Connector streetcar and Waterfront Seattle to design and phase-in cost-effective complete streets that are a win-win for everyone.

Outreach Process

Below is our outreach process for implementing bicycle projects (Bicycle Master Plan, page 94). This project primarily focuses on step 2, helping us prioritize the network and move through a portion of its design. Seattle has an ambitious schedule for implementing protected bike lanes in the Center City. Check out our five-year implementation plan.

As a part of the outreach for the project, SDOT has developed a Sounding Board made up of community members representing businesses, freight, people who bike, private development and residents. Learn more about the Sounding Board here.

Get Involved

Better bike infrastructure can benefit everyone especially when various perspectives are involved in the planning. SDOT is seeking input and guidance from people who live, travel and work downtown and in adjacent neighborhoods.

Outreach will include open houses, briefings, regular email updates, and a Sounding Board made up of Center City stakeholders.

Click here to sign up for email updates.

Project Contacts

Project Email: CCBike@Seattle.gov
SDOT Project Manager: Sandra “Sam” Woods
SDOT Communications Lead: Dawn Schellenberg

Traffic safety improvements at 47th Avenue SW and SW Admiral Way now complete

Update: Here is a brief video of SDOT Director Scott Kubly chatting about the safety improvements made at 47 Ave SW and SW Admiral Way in West Seattle.

 

Over the last four months, crews working for the Seattle Department of Transportation constructed the 47th/Admiral Signal project, a set of improvements supported by many in the community. On Tuesday, July 14, SDOT Director Scott Kubly joined Councilmember Tom Rasmussen, the Admiral Neighborhood Association (ANA) and community members to commemorate the project’s completion. Community members gathered for an event on the street corner in front of Alki Mail & Dispatch on a sunny summer evening.

Admiral Way Safety

David Whiting ANA, Councilmember Tom Rasmussen, SDOT Dir.Scott Kubly and community members join to celebrate safety completion, artist reveals sidewalk art display.

SDOT partnered with the ANA and Alki Mail & Dispatch to host this completion event. Tuesday’s event provided an opportunity to thank committed community members who have been involved over the years and remember former Councilmember David Della’s aide, Matthew “Tatsuo” Nakata, who was struck and killed at the location while crossing the intersection in 2006. Former Councilmember Della attended the event and was grateful for the safety project’s completion and the community support at the event.

To commemorate the project and the collective effort that went into making the traffic safety improvements a reality, the ANA commissioned artist Peregrine Church, of Rainworks, to create a concrete stencil for two of the sidewalk corners. These stencils only appear when wet and Tuesday’s event concluded with an unveiling of Church’s work.

These improvements are a part of Seattle’s Vision Zero plan to improve safety for all roadway users. Just a few months ago, this winding and steep five-way intersection was equipped with a flashing overhead pedestrian beacon and one striped crosswalk. Now, the intersection of 47th Avenue SW and SW Admiral Way is equipped with a full traffic signal, five striped crosswalks, upgraded curb ramps to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards and will soon have a center left-turn pocket. Residents and travelers in the area will continue to see safety improvements as the SW Admiral Way Safety Project gets underway.

We appreciate the community’s patience and ongoing support while we worked to complete this project.

Mercer Corridor Project – Where We’ve been and what’s next

The Mercer neighborhood
Whether you’ve attended a concert at Seattle Center, watched the Fourth of July Fireworks around Lake Union, or dined at one of the many area restaurants, you’ve probably traveled along Mercer Street at some point. For more than 40 years, the Mercer Corridor has been a sticky transportation challenge. A priority for SDOT is addressing the needs of all users in the area which includes the 80,000 vehicles using the I-5 interchange daily, in addition to the growing number of pedestrians and bicyclists as people and businesses move into South Lake Union. SDOT is dedicated to keeping people, goods, and services moving on this major corridor in our city. Together with WSDOT’s North Portal project, the two projects will rebuild the street grid across Aurora Ave. N to connect South Lake Union, Uptown, and Seattle Center.

Mercer construction – nearly complete!
In early 2010, SDOT began the first phase of construction, Mercer East, and in August 2012 Mercer St. opened to two-way traffic between I-5 and 9th Ave. N. The next phase of construction, Mercer West, began in 2013, and focused on the corridor between Dexter Ave. N and 5th Ave. W. SDOT is pleased to announce that substantial completion for Mercer West is anticipated to occur later this summer.

In June, final lane striping along Mercer St. was completed and the intersection of Mercer St. and Dexter Ave. N was changed into its final configuration. This means that all turns are now legal – but please be sure to obey the signals to protect other vehicles, pedestrians, and bicyclists! Crews are currently working to complete sidewalks and landscaping along Mercer St. as well as a median between 8th and 9th avenues. The intersection of 5th Ave. N and Thomas St. will also be completed with final striping, crosswalks, and signal timing in August. At this point, Mercer Street and 5th Ave. North will be in their final configurations. This means that all signals, turn lanes, crosswalks, and sidewalks will be open and in their final configurations.

While construction on Mercer Street is nearly complete, the Project will be adding work for WSDOT’s North Portal Area Projects to our contract. The Mercer West Project will install a large storm water detention pipe in Roy Street between Fourth Ave N and Fifth Ave N this fall. This will provide storm water detention to meet code requirements for WSDOT’s North Portal Area Projects. SDOT and WSDOT have coordinated with Seattle Public Utilities and determined that this new facility is the most cost-effective way for WSDOT to meet the storm water detention requirements under the Seattle Municipal Code. It is also the preferred approach for Seattle Public Utilities who will own and maintain the detention system.

2015_0716_Mercer_Milestones_Summer2015_edits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keep in touch

Even though Mercer Corridor construction only has a few months left, we are always happy to answer any and all questions about its construction and your travels through the area. The best way to reach us is via email at mercerinfo@seattle.gov or via the 24-hour construction hotline at 206-419-5818. To receive up-to-minute construction updates, visit our website and join our project email list at http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/mercercorridor.htmAs always, SDOT thanks you for your patience while project construction nears completion.

Come share your ideas for the Center City Bike Network 7/21 at Town Hall

What’s your vision for a more vibrant city and safer traveling experience for people walking, biking and driving downtown? Please join us for the Center City Bike Network open house to meet the project team and share your vision for the project.

Tuesday, July 21 at Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave, from 5:00 – 7:00 PM

  • Learn the history and next steps in the selection and design process
  • Share specific input as well as your vision for a more vibrant city and safer traveling experience for people walking, biking and driving downtown
  • We’ll have activities for kids too!

 

The Seattle Department of Transportation is studying and prioritizing locations for a protected bicycle lane network in downtown Seattle. This work builds on outreach and data collected as part of Seattle’s 2014 Bicycle Master Plan. SDOT plans to implement the Center City Bike Network of protected bike lanes by 2020, pending funding availability.

ccb2015_0701_project_map

Why Protected Bike Lanes?

U.S. cities are increasingly embracing protected bike lanes that separate people on bikes from people in cars by using physical barriers such as posts, parked cars or simple landscaping.
Seattle’s downtown network of protected bike lanes aims to:

  • Improve safety and predictability by separating all modes of travel
  • Expand connectivity throughout downtown and the rest of Seattle as our city continues to grow
  • Boost business by offering more travel options for getting to them
  • Promote physical activity and increase ridership by supporting people of all ages and abilities
  • Provide affordable travel options

 

Design that Builds on Best Practices

Like all good transportation systems, protected bike lanes require smart investments and careful planning. SDOT will use a combination of technical analysis, ongoing public input and coordination with projects such as the Center City Connector streetcar and Waterfront Seattle to design and phase-in cost-effective complete streets that are a win-win for everyone.

Outreach Process

Below is our outreach process for implementing bicycle projects (Bicycle Master Plan, page 94). This project primarily focuses on step 2, helping us prioritize the network and move through a portion of its design. Seattle has an ambitious schedule for implementing protected bike lanes in the Center City. Check out our five-year implementation plan.

As a part of the outreach for the project, SDOT has developed a Sounding Board made up of community members representing businesses, freight, people who bike, private development and residents. Learn more about the Sounding Board here.

Get Involved

Better bike infrastructure can benefit everyone especially when various perspectives are involved in the planning. SDOT is seeking input and guidance from people who live, travel and work downtown and in adjacent neighborhoods.

Outreach will include open houses, briefings, regular email updates, and a Sounding Board made up of Center City stakeholders.

Click here to sign up for email updates.

Project Contacts

Project Email: CCBike@Seattle.gov
SDOT Project Manager: Sandra “Sam” Woods
SDOT Communications Lead: Dawn Schellenberg

How Should Seattle Grow? Seattle 2035: Draft Plan Published

The Seattle Department of Planning and Development (DPD) has released a Draft City of Seattle Comprehensive Plan. Entitled Seattle 2035, the Draft Plan is now available for public comment.  This important milestone brings the City one step closer to completing an updated Comprehensive Plan – our roadmap for Seattle’s next 20 years.

DEIS-Featured-Image

The Draft Plan is informed by the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) that was released in May 2015.  The Draft Plan identifies proposed goals and policies to help achieve our vision for Seattle’s future.  Seattle is expected to grow by 120,000 residents and 115,000 jobs in the coming twenty years.  The Draft Plan also includes a new Future Land Use Map, showing a pattern of growth that supports the City’s vision.

The City of Seattle is seeking public feedback on proposed goals and policies as we continue to evaluate strategies to build a safe, vibrant, affordable, interconnected, and innovative city for all.  City staff has already received hundreds of public comments on the DEIS and on the overall direction of the Plan document.

DPD is seeking public comments on the Draft Plan during a three-month public comment period, from July 8 through the end of September.

Here’s how to join the discussion about Seattle’s future and provide comments:

  • Join the Seattle 2035 Online Community Conversation at seattle2035.consider.it and discuss the potential pros and cons of proposed policies with other Seattleites
  • Attend our Draft Plan Public Event on September 15 – Stay tuned for more details
  • Follow Seattle 2035 on Facebook and Twitter
  • Send comments by the end of September:
    • Email: Send comments to 2035@seattle.gov
    • Mail: Send comments to the City of Seattle Department of Planning and Development, Attn: Seattle 2035, 700 5th Avenue, Suite 2000, PO Box 34019, Seattle WA 98124-4019.
    • In Person: Attend our Draft Plan Public Event on September 15. Stay tuned for more details!

Skyline

Seattle_2035_RedOnWhite-300x221

Please Join us at our Upcoming 35th Ave SW Safety Plan Meetings

SDOT would like to invite you to our next public meetings for 35th Ave SW happening this month. Since October 2014, we’ve been working with community members and our West Seattle neighbors to get ideas on how to improve safety on 35th Ave SW.

35thSW image

Our next open house meetings will be held to discuss our upcoming plans:

• Wednesday, July 15th from 7 – 9 PM at the Neighborhood House (6400 Sylvan Way SW)

• Thursday, July 16th from 6 – 7:45 PM at the Southwest Branch of the Seattle Public Library (9010 35th Ave SW)

We’ll be presenting our traffic analysis results and our plans to improve safety along this corridor.

We previously held four public meetings about 35th Ave SW and hosted one walking tour in May.  We heard a lot of good comments at our events and are incorporating a majority of them into our design and appreciate the feedback and community participation.

35th Ave SW at SW Cambridge Street

The Safety Project corridor is 35th Avenue SW between SW Roxbury Street and SW Avalon Way.

Safety is the City’s number one priority, and we are committed to preventing collisions and improving safety for all users of the transportation system.

Please join us at the open house and learn how we plan to improve the safety for everyone along 35th Ave SW. http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/35thSW.htm.

We hope to see you there!