SDOT’s 2015 Accomplishments

SDOT’s 2015 Accomplishments

To meet the challenges of a rapidly growing city while improving safety, delivering its core services, and providing more options for travelers, the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) focused on launching important new initiatives in 2015.

Seattle Skyline Day

Maintenance:

The nine-year Bridging the Gap transportation levy ended in 2015 and SDOT worked diligently to deliver on the work promised using this funding. A few examples of 2015 work funded by Bridging the Gap include 15 lane-miles of street paving, 11 blocks of new sidewalks, 3,500 trees pruned, 240 maintenance repairs to bridges, and 38 stairways rehabilitated or repaired. The West Emerson Overpass underwent successful upgrade and repairs. Several neighborhoods across the city benefited from microsurfacing (43.3 miles of streets), a preventative maintenance surface treatment that preserves roadways. Nearly 100 percent of potholes requests were filled within three business days.

Safety:

In 2015 the City of Seattle launched Vision Zero with the goal of ending traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2030. SDOT studied corridors with high numbers of collisions – Rainier Avenue South, 35th Avenue Southwest, Southwest Roxbury Street and Lake City Way Northeast—to identify ways to improve safety. The department enhanced these four corridors through changes proven effective in reducing collisions, such as lower speed limits, redesigned lane configurations, and improved signage and pedestrian crossings. Preliminary data shows serious collisions were down 26 percent in 2015 from the previous three years.

SDOT also developed the Safe Routes to School Five-Year Action Plan, a part of Vision Zero, to guide new investments in critical areas that will make it even safer and easier for kids to walk and bike to school. The department improved sidewalks and pedestrian crossings on 12 walk-to-school routes around the city and installed school speed zone enforcement cameras at six additional schools.

To provide safer and more comfortable routes for walking and bicycling, more than three miles of neighborhood greenways were added—which are designated routes on non-arterial, low traffic volume streets with safety improvements added—and began work on another nine miles.

In 2015 SDOT and the Seattle Police Department adopted a data-driven approach to enforcement, so that patrols are dispatched to locations where collisions occur frequently and focus on the behaviors that contribute to crashes. SDOT partnered with community organizations to raise awareness about top safety issues, such as developing public service announcements about pedestrian safety for older adults with AARP and KOMO TV.

SDOT also partnered with MADD and Lyft to provide discounted rides home in Seattle’s nightlife hotspots to deter impaired driving. SDOT and SPD additionally coordinated “Blocking the Box” enforcement which helps address vehicles that illegally stop in the intersection impeding traffic and safe pedestrian crossings.

Transit:

SDOT additionally worked with King County Metro and Sound Transit to make public transit more convenient, faster and more reliable. The department purchased 225,000 hours of additional transit service on Metro’s routes. SDOT installed 11 additional Real Time Information System screens on Metro Route 44 to inform passengers when to expect their next bus. SDOT and Metro also established a program to provide a fare discount for low-income riders. SDOT also coordinated transit lane enforcement with Seattle Police at critical locations.

To address Seattle’s rapid growth, inspectors were assigned to coordinate and monitor public and private work occurring in areas of intense construction, minimizing impacts to the right of way. SDOT also revised policies and procedures for responding to traffic incidents, supporting faster lane openings for collisions, and installed additional dynamic message signs and upgraded traffic cameras to provide advance notice of traffic conditions.

Other accomplishments in 2015 include:

Parking:

  • Installed 330 new parking pay stations; adjusted on-street parking rates in 12 areas
  • Expanded e-Park to three new garages and installed two new e-Park electronic signs

Pedestrian safety improvements:

  • Improved pedestrian crossings at 35 intersections; installed new signal at 47th SW and Admiral Way SW
  • Installed or upgraded 210 curb ramps
  • Finalized a new director’s rule addressing pedestrian safety around construction

Bicycling facility improvements:

  • Added bike lanes and sharrows to seven miles of streets and maintained 50 miles of bike lane markings
  • Installed bike route signs on 26 miles of routes
  • Provided racks and corrals for 566 parking spaces for bikes

Open space:

  • Oversaw a pilot Play Streets program with 170 play streets
  • Implemented two pavement to parks projects, three parklets and two streateries
  • Converted four shoreline street ends into neighborhood public spaces

Street Operations:

  • Implemented TIMS (Traffic Incident Management Systems) to improve incident responses
  • Expanded Transportation Operations Center hours from 13 (6 a.m.-7 p.m.) to 16 (6 a.m.-10 p.m.) hours weekdays in addition to adding weekends, and are able to staff remotely during off-hours
Share Button

Safety First: Added School Zone Enforcement Cameras Start Monday

ChildrenCrossingSpeedSigns

To protect more children walking and biking to and from school, SDOT and the Seattle Police Department recently installed school zone speed cameras near six additional schools.

A reminder that starting on Monday, October 19th, the new safety cameras installed near six schools this fall will stop issuing warnings and start issuing $234 tickets to people driving above the school zone speed limit of 20 MPH.

The school zone speed limit is 20 MPH for good reason – a person walking hit by a person driving 20 MPH or slower is likely to survive, but the likelihood of surviving a crash decreases significantly the faster the person is driving. Further, elementary school kids haven’t developed the cognitive ability to accurately judge how fast a person is driving or how quickly a person can stop their car. Traffic collisions are the number one cause of death for 5 to 24 year olds nationally. Let’s work together to change these statistics in our community.

The new safety cameras were installed this fall in these six school zones:

  • Northgate Elementary School, on 1st Ave NE from N 120th St to N 117th St
  • Montlake Elementary School, on 24th Ave E from E Calhoun St to E Lynn St
  • Bailey Gatzert Elementary School, on Boren Ave from E Yesler Way to S Main St
  • Mercer Middle School, on 15th Ave S/S Columbian Way from S Nevada St to S Snoqualmie St
  • K-8 STEM & Arbor Heights Elementaries, on Delridge Way SW from SW Juneau St to 22nd Ave SW
  • Rainier View Elementary, on Beacon Ave S from S Moore St to 56th Ave S

Beacon

The 20 MPH speed limit is in effect when the yellow beacons next to the speed limit sign are flashing. The safety cameras are only active when the beacons are flashing. To learn more about how the safety cameras work, view our new brochure on our safety camera webpage.

The school zone safety cameras are part of SDOT’s Safe Routes to School program, which aims to make it easier and safer for students to walk and bike. Safe Routes to School is one of Seattle’s Vision Zero initiatives, a program to end fatalities and serious injuries on our streets by 2030.

Share Button

SDOT and AARP Seattle Partner to Achieve Vision Zero

SDOT and AARP Seattle are launching a new public service campaign that highlights safety tips for people driving and walking. The campaign is part of Seattle’s Vision Zero plan to end traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2030.

VisionZeroLogo

Video, online, and radio announcements will run throughout September on KOMO 4 TV, Univision Seattle, KOMO News Radio, KVI Talk Radio and KOMOnews.com. The campaign’s timing coincides with the historic trend of collisions increasing during the darker and wetter months of fall and winter.

Seattle is aggressively working to reduce serious and fatal collisions on our streets through Vision Zero. Partnering with AARP on this campaign allows the city to reach drivers and our most vulnerable residents to enhance the safety of our roads.

While Seattle is consistently recognized as one of the safest cities in the country, more than 10,000 traffic collisions occur each year. In 2014, there were 3,449 injury collisions reported to the Seattle Police Department. 15 people died due to those crashes in 2014, including five who were walking or riding a bike.

Education is a key component to help keep our most vulnerable populations (people young and old, walking and biking) safe and achieve Vision Zero in Seattle – a term that comes from the belief that death and injury on city streets are preventable. This is the second year that SDOT and AARP have teamed up on traffic safety. The public service announcements are being made possible with a grant from the Washington Traffic Safety Commission and funding from AARP.

People over age 50 are particularly vulnerable on Seattle’s streets, representing 70 percent of pedestrian fatalities in the last three years. As a partner in Vision Zero, AARP Seattle is working with the City to help raise safety awareness and prevent collisions.

The City of Seattle is committed to ending traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2030. Earlier this year, Seattle launched Vision Zero to design smarter streets, enforce existing laws, and educate the public on safe travel behavior. For more information, visit http://www.seattle.gov/visionzero.

AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of nearly 38 million, that helps people turn their goals and dreams into real possibilities, strengthens communities and fights for the issues that matter most to families such as healthcare, employment and income security, retirement planning, affordable utilities and protection from financial abuse. http://www.aarp.org

Lake City Way NE

Lake City Way N

Share Button

Neighborhood Street Fund Projects Moving Along! West Woodland Complete, Lake to Bay Underway

One pedestrian improvement project wraps up, and another begins!

After seven weeks of construction, pedestrian safety improvements around the intersection of 3rd Avenue NW, NW 56th Street and NW 55th Place, near West Woodland Elementary School in Ballard, are now finished.

Before

Before: A confusing intersection with long pedestrian crossing distances

The Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) appreciates the community’s patience throughout this project. These improvements will make it safer for people who walk, bike and drive:

  • New four-way stop at 3rd Avenue NW and NW 56th Street, to slow all traffic
  • New curb extensions (or “bulbs”), to shorten pedestrian crossings
  • New curb ramps, which comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards, to improve accessibility
  • New signs, to alert drivers to watch out for pedestrians
After: Schoolchildren and their parents will appreciate safer crossings in the fall

After: Schoolchildren and their parents will appreciate safer crossings in the fall

Half of the West Woodland Pedestrian Safety Improvements Project was funded through SDOT’s Neighborhood Street Fund (NSF) Program, which is financed by the Bridging the Gap program approved by Seattle voters in 2006. The other half of this project’s funding has come from the Safe Routes to Schools program.

Our next Neighborhood Street Fund project will improve pedestrian safety in Lower Queen Anne. Work begins August 3 and is expected to last six weeks, depending on the weather. The construction work, on W Harrison Street at the intersections with 1st Avenue W and 2nd Avenue W, is part of the “Lake to Bay Loop” project, because W Harrison Street connects the South Lake Union area to Elliott Bay.

At these two intersections on W Harrison Street, crews working for SDOT will install new curb extensions, ramps that comply with ADA standards, and new marked pedestrian crossings.

People walking, biking and driving can expect the following impacts during construction:

  • 24/7 road and sidewalk closures at the intersections of 1st Avenue W and 2nd Avenue W at W Harrison Street (see construction notice for details)
  • Short-term parking and lane restrictions on W Harrison Street and on both 1st Avenue W and 2nd Avenue W
  • Noise, dust and vibration
  • Typical weekday work hours, 7 AM to 5 PM

Please check the construction notice for more information on the impacts and suggested travel routes.

If you have any questions or concerns during this construction on W Harrison Street, please contact the project team at NSF@seattle.gov or 206-733-9361.

You may learn more about the project by visiting the website: www.seattle.gov/transportation/harrisonstreetimprovements.htm. You may also use this link to sign up to receive project email updates.

Share Button

When you don’t live near a bus route….

A Vanpool or Van Share may be the solution to your commute if there is no public transit near your home or near your workplace. Sharing a van is a convenient and cost-effective for the everyday commuter. You can use HOV lanes on the freeways, save money on gas and parking, and can shorten your commute instead of driving solo.

Metro Vanpool_Flickr_Oran Viriyincy

Van Shares you could be using!

Five or more people can form a Vanpool or Van Share. Vanpool participants share a flat monthly cost based on round trip distance and the number of people in the van. Van Share riders pay $185 each month, split among all riders. Gas, insurance and maintenance are all paid for both.

When you form a Vanpool, one person can act as driver and bookkeeper, but it’s nice if more people share these roles. You’ll enjoy discounted parking in some areas as well.

Van Shares are like Vanpools except they are limited to 20 miles round trip and must connect with transit, ferries, or trains for one leg of the trip. For example, you could use the Sounder commuter rail to arrive at King Street Station, and then pick up a Van Share in the garage and drive to your work outside of downtown.

RSO Vanpool Bike (48)

You can get help finding members for your van or attend a “ride share meetup” in your area this summer.

For more information on Vanpools and Van Shares, visit us here or call (206) 625-4500.

Share Button

Mayor, City Announce Revised Transportation Levy to Move Seattle

On March 2, 2015, Mayor Ed Murray launched Move Seattle, a vision for transportation in our city for the next 10 years. Move Seattle connects and integrates existing plans for walking, biking, transit, and freight into a holistic 10-year strategy that will help the city meet present demands while also looking ahead to the future as we continue to grow

For the past year, the Mayor and SDOT have worked together to prepare a draft transportation levy proposal to replace the current transportation levy, called Bridging the Gap (BTG), that expires at the end of 2015. Approved by voters in 2006, BTG has helped address our maintenance backlog, increase transit reliability, and improve safety.

Mayor Murray announces the Levy to Move Seattle.

Mayor Murray announces the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle.

On March 18, Mayor Murray and SDOT unveiled the draft Transportation Levy to Move Seattle and began a citywide conversation about our next major investment in transportation.

The proposed 9-year, $900 million draft Transportation Levy to Move Seattle proposal aimed to:

  • Take care of the basics by paving streets, retrofitting bridges, and improving road safety
  • Invest in our transportation system to keep pace with our growing city
  • Improve safety and mobility for all travelers – people walking, biking, driving cars, moving goods, and taking transit
  • Contribute to an integrated and connected system that is easy-to-use, affordable, and convenient

Improvements proposed in the draft levy were organized around Mayor Murray’s vision for Seattle: a city that is safe, affordable, interconnected, and vibrant.

It was the City’s goal that this levy reflect the needs of our communities and improve the day-to-day realities of getting around a growing Seattle. To accomplish this, from mid- March through April 2015, SDOT and the Mayor’s Office engaged in a citywide outreach effort to better understand the public’s transportation priorities and receive feedback on the draft levy proposal.


The draft levy proposal was revised in early May to reflect community priorities communicated during the public engagement process.

Mayor Murray and SDOT released the revised levy proposal on May 6, 2015.

Mayor Murray presents revised proposal (upper left; clockwise as follows), Community supporters, SDOT Director Scott Kubly, Rebecca Saldana, Puget Sound Sage

Mayor Murray presents revised proposal (upper left; clockwise as follows); Community supporters; SDOT Director Scott Kubly with Kelly Aramaki, Seattle Public Schools; Rebecca Saldana, Puget Sound Sage with Councilmembers Tom Rasmussen and Mike O’Brien.

 

Reflecting Community Priorities

During the public engagement process, we heard that the people of Seattle view safety, particularly for people on foot and on bicycle, as a top priority. We also heard support for greater investments in transit reliability and access, improved connections to light rail, and making it safer and more comfortable for people to walk throughout Seattle. We have revised the proposal to reflect these community priorities.

The revised levy proposal that Mayor Murray will submit to City Council responds to community feedback by increasing funds for neighborhood priority projects, transit investments, and pedestrian safety and mobility. It would fund $930 million in investments over nine years – $30 million more than the draft proposal released in March. The additional funding would come from levy revenue growth caused by growth in Seattle property value and number of households. The final levy’s cost to taxpayers ($275 annually for the owner of a median value home) would remain the same as proposed earlier.

Once the levy legislation is submitted to City Council, SDOT and the Mayor’s Office will coordinate closely with Councilmembers as they review it and will continue to encourage community feedback on the proposal.

Learn more about the levy and share your feedback with us. There are many ways you can get involved in the discussion.

Questions? Contact Allison Schwartz, Levy Outreach Lead, at allison.schwartz@seattle.gov or (206) 386-4654

 

Share Button

Chat with SDOT Director Scott Kubly to learn more and share your feedback on the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle

Join SDOT Director Scott Kubly for coffee and conversation in Fremont, Thursday afternoon:

 

Scott Kubly

Scott Kubly

Milstead & Co Coffee, 770 N 34th St  Thursday, 4/20, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a Calendar of Upcoming Events (calendar will continue to be updated):

  • 4/22/15 – Greater Duwamish Dist. Council 6:30 PM at Georgetown City Hall, 6202 13th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Southeast District Council 6:30 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Northwest District Council 7 PM at Greenwood Senior Center, 525 N 85th St
  • 4/23/15 – Coffee with Scott Kubly 1 – 2 PM at Milstead & Co Coffee, 770 N 34th St
  • 4/23/15 – Drop-in session 5 – 7 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/25/15 – U District Farmers Market 9 AM – 2 PM at University Way NE between 50th & 52nd
  • 4/26/15 – Fremont Sunday Market 10 AM – 5 PM at Corner of 3410 Evanston Ave North
  • 4/26/15 – Broadway Farmers Market 11 AM – 3 PM at Broadway Ave E and E Pine St
  • 4/26/15 – Ballard Farmers Market 10 AM – 3 PM at 5345 Ballard Ave NW
  • 4/26/15 – West Seattle Farmers Market 10 AM – 2 PM at California Ave SW & SW Alaska
  • 5/6/15 – Columbia City Farmers Market  3 – 7 PM at 37th Ave S and S Edmunds St

 

Mayor Murray announced a proposal last month for a nine-year, $900 million levy to replace the existing $365 million Bridging the Gap levy that expires at the end of 2015. The Transportation Levy to Move Seattle proposal focuses on taking care of the basics, maintaining our streets, bridges, and sidewalks, while also investing in the future with improvements that give us more transportation choices to move more people and goods in and around our growing city.

Mayor Murray announces Levy to Move Seattle

Since introducing the levy proposal, we’ve hosted three open houses in different parts of the city, and presented to numerous community and business organizations, as well as city advisory boards and commissions. We’ll continue these community briefings, and throughout April, will be hosting an additional round of opportunities for the public to learn about the proposal and provide feedback.

Share your input: Take this short survey to tell us what you think of the proposal and share your transportation priorities: www.moveseattlesurvey.com

http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/LevytoMoveSeattle.htm

 

Share Button

Chat with SDOT Director Scott Kubly to learn more and share your feedback on the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle

Join SDOT Director Scott Kubly for morning coffee and informal conversation in South Park or online Monday evening:

Scott Kubly

Scott Kubly

  • Via Vadi Caffèe, 8600 14th Ave. S  Monday, 4/20, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.
  • Online Meeting from 6 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. Please Register at

 

 

 

 

Here is a Calendar of Upcoming Events (calendar will continue to be updated):

  • 4/19/15 – West Seattle Farmers Market 10 AM – 2 PM at California Ave SW & SW Alaska
  • 4/20/15 – Online Open House 6 – 6:45 PM – Register online, see above.
  • 4/20/15 – Coffee with Scott Kubly 8 – 9 AM at Via Vadi Caffee, 8600 14th Avenue S
  • 4/21/15 – Seattle Freight Advisory Board 9:30 – 11:30 AM at Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue Rm. L-280
  • 4/22/15 – Greater Duwamish District Council 6:30 PM at Georgetown City Hall, 6202 13th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Southeast District Council 6:30 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Northwest District Council 7 PM at Greenwood Senior Center, 525 N 85th St
  • 4/23/15 – Coffee with Scott Kubly 1 – 2 PM at Milstead & Co Coffee, 770 N 34th St
  • 4/23/15 – Drop-in session 5 – 7 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/25/15 – U District Farmers Market 9 AM – 2 PM at University Way NE between 50th & 52nd
  • 4/26/15 – Fremont Sunday Market 10 AM – 5 PM at Corner of 3410 Evanston Ave North
  • 4/26/15 – Broadway Farmers Market 11 AM – 3 PM at Broadway Ave E and E Pine St
  • 4/26/15 – Ballard Farmers Market 10 AM – 3 PM at 5345 Ballard Ave NW
  • 4/26/15 – West Seattle Farmers Market 10 AM – 2 PM at California Ave SW & SW Alaska
  • 5/6/15 – Columbia City Farmers Market  3 – 7 PM at 37th Ave S and S Edmunds St

 

Mayor Murray announced a proposal last month for a nine-year, $900 million levy to replace the existing $365 million Bridging the Gap levy that expires at the end of 2015. The Transportation Levy to Move Seattle proposal focuses on taking care of the basics, maintaining our streets, bridges, and sidewalks, while also investing in the future with improvements that give us more transportation choices to move more people and goods in and around our growing city.

Mayor Murray announces Levy to Move Seattle

Mayor Murray announces Levy to Move Seattle

Since introducing the levy proposal, we’ve hosted three open houses in different parts of the city, and presented to numerous community and business organizations, as well as city advisory boards and commissions. We’ll continue these community briefings, and throughout April, will be hosting an additional round of opportunities for the public to learn about the proposal and provide feedback.

 

 

 

Share your input: Take this short survey to tell us what you think of the proposal and share your transportation priorities: www.moveseattlesurvey.com

http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/LevytoMoveSeattle.htm

ltms_header

Share Button

What do you think about the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle?

Join SDOT Director Scott Kubly for coffee in the coming weeks to learn more and share your feedback on the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle. Lots of other opportunities to engage, as well.

Last month, Mayor Murray announced a proposal for a nine-year, $900 million levy to replace the existing $365 million Bridging the Gap levy that expires at the end of 2015. The Transportation Levy to Move Seattle proposal focuses on taking care of the basics, maintaining our streets, bridges, and sidewalks, while also investing in the future with improvements that give us more transportation choices to move more people and goods in and around our growing city.

Since introducing the levy proposal, we’ve hosted three open houses in different parts of the city, and presented to numerous community and business organizations, as well as city advisory boards and commissions. We’ll continue these community briefings, and throughout April, will be hosting an additional round of opportunities for the public to learn about the proposal and provide feedback.

 

Here are ways to participate:

  1. Take the survey (it is available in multiple languages) to share your transportation priorities at: www.moveseattlesurvey.com
  2. Participate in an online meeting where you’ll hear from SDOT Director Scott Kubly and have the opportunity to ask questions on Monday, April 20 from 6 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. Please click here to sign up.
  3. Join SDOT Director Scott Kubly for coffee and informal conversation at one of these local coffee shops:
  • Central District: Starbucks 2300 South Jackson on Monday, April 13, 2 to 3 p.m.
  • Chinatown/International District: Eastern Café 510 Maynard Ave S on Tuesday, April 14, 8 to 9 a.m.
  • Lake City: Kaffeeklatsch Seattle 12513 Lake City Way NE on Friday, April 17, 8 to 9 a.m.
  • South Park: Via Vadi Caffèe 8600 14th Avenue S on Monday, April 20, 8 to 9 a.m.
  • Fremont: Milstead & Co Coffee 770 N 34th St on Thursday, April 23, 1 to 2 p.m.

 

Also, be on the lookout for city staff providing information and seeking feedback around the city at farmers markets, community centers, and other public places. For the full list of engagement opportunities and more information on the levy proposal, visit www.seattle.gov/levytomoveseattle.

 

What’s next?

Mayor Murray will send his final proposal to the City Council in early May, and the Council will discuss the proposal and engage the public throughout the spring. For a levy to be considered for inclusion on the November ballot, the City Council will need to send a final proposal to King County by early August.

Your feedback now will help shape the Mayor’s final proposal. We encourage you to get involved – take the survey, join us for coffee, sign up for email updates, and learn more at www.seattle.gov/levytomoveseattle.

ltms_header

If you have questions or feedback on the levy proposal, please contact SDOT’s Levy Outreach Lead Allison Schwartz at allison.schwartz@seattle.gov or (206) 386-4654.

Share Button

Georgetown Bites Celebrates the Colorful Cuisine of Historic Georgetown Saturday 3/28

SDOT recently began work on Georgetown Festival Street. So what is a festival street? It’s a public place that has been designated for recurring temporary closure to vehicular traffic use for the purpose of pedestrian-oriented special activities.

The Georgetown Festival Street will be on 12th Avenue S between S Vale (All-City Coffee) and S Bailey Streets (at the end of the block – past the overpass). It will also include S Vale Street between 12th Avenue S and Airport Way S.

As you all might know the Georgetown industrial arts corridor is home to some of Seattle’s most distinguished culinary attractions. From boutique breweries to chocolate confections, decadent burgers to gourmet delis, soda fountains to yogurt factories, Seattle’s oldest neighborhood is also its most sumptuous.

Here’s a heads up on a Saturday event celebrating Georgetown:

Georgetown Bites: A Taste of Georgetown offers delicacies from 28 diverse drinking and dining establishments on Saturday, March 28 from 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM. For only $20 patrons can purchase five tickets redeemable for special offers throughout the neighborhood, Additional tickets are available for $5 each. Tickets will be sold at the Georgetown Bites booth at the Georgetown Trailer Park Mall from 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM the day of the event.

Gtown Bites

The food and hospitality industry played a pivotal role in Georgetown’s remarkable revitalization over the past decade. Early producer Georgetown Brewing (maker of the popular Manny’s Pale Ale) has been joined by Ellenos Yogurt and Fran’s Chocolates (favored by America’s first couple Barack and Michele Obama and celebrity chef Bobby Flay.) Pioneering dining and nightlife establishments like Jules Maes Saloon, one of the region’s oldest taverns, along with nearby Nine Pound Hammer, Stellar Pizza, and Smarty Pants have attracted a growing array of alluring restaurants, bars, and cafes including Zippy’s Burgers, Via Tribunali, Georgetown Liquor Company, Brass Tacks, Square Knot Diner, All City Coffee, Hallava Falafel, Flying Squirrel, Star Brass Lounge, Hitchcock Deli, and many more.

Georgetown Bites also marks the official groundbreaking for the Festival Street project, creating a pedestrian and arts friendly plaza in the heart of the Georgetown business district with funding from Seattle’s Bridging the Gap program. This attractive amenity will be christened at the 9th annual Georgetown Carnival arts festival on Saturday, June 13.

The public is invited to experience the historic Georgetown neighborhood while sampling some of Seattle’s most creative cuisine.  For a map of participating businesses and related information, visit: www.georgetownbites.com

Gtown Bites2

 

Share Button