Neighborhood Street Fund Projects Moving Along! West Woodland Complete, Lake to Bay Underway

One pedestrian improvement project wraps up, and another begins!

After seven weeks of construction, pedestrian safety improvements around the intersection of 3rd Avenue NW, NW 56th Street and NW 55th Place, near West Woodland Elementary School in Ballard, are now finished.

Before

Before: A confusing intersection with long pedestrian crossing distances

The Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) appreciates the community’s patience throughout this project. These improvements will make it safer for people who walk, bike and drive:

  • New four-way stop at 3rd Avenue NW and NW 56th Street, to slow all traffic
  • New curb extensions (or “bulbs”), to shorten pedestrian crossings
  • New curb ramps, which comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards, to improve accessibility
  • New signs, to alert drivers to watch out for pedestrians
After: Schoolchildren and their parents will appreciate safer crossings in the fall

After: Schoolchildren and their parents will appreciate safer crossings in the fall

Half of the West Woodland Pedestrian Safety Improvements Project was funded through SDOT’s Neighborhood Street Fund (NSF) Program, which is financed by the Bridging the Gap program approved by Seattle voters in 2006. The other half of this project’s funding has come from the Safe Routes to Schools program.

Our next Neighborhood Street Fund project will improve pedestrian safety in Lower Queen Anne. Work begins August 3 and is expected to last six weeks, depending on the weather. The construction work, on W Harrison Street at the intersections with 1st Avenue W and 2nd Avenue W, is part of the “Lake to Bay Loop” project, because W Harrison Street connects the South Lake Union area to Elliott Bay.

At these two intersections on W Harrison Street, crews working for SDOT will install new curb extensions, ramps that comply with ADA standards, and new marked pedestrian crossings.

People walking, biking and driving can expect the following impacts during construction:

  • 24/7 road and sidewalk closures at the intersections of 1st Avenue W and 2nd Avenue W at W Harrison Street (see construction notice for details)
  • Short-term parking and lane restrictions on W Harrison Street and on both 1st Avenue W and 2nd Avenue W
  • Noise, dust and vibration
  • Typical weekday work hours, 7 AM to 5 PM

Please check the construction notice for more information on the impacts and suggested travel routes.

If you have any questions or concerns during this construction on W Harrison Street, please contact the project team at NSF@seattle.gov or 206-733-9361.

You may learn more about the project by visiting the website: www.seattle.gov/transportation/harrisonstreetimprovements.htm. You may also use this link to sign up to receive project email updates.

When you don’t live near a bus route….

A Vanpool or Van Share may be the solution to your commute if there is no public transit near your home or near your workplace. Sharing a van is a convenient and cost-effective for the everyday commuter. You can use HOV lanes on the freeways, save money on gas and parking, and can shorten your commute instead of driving solo.

Metro Vanpool_Flickr_Oran Viriyincy

Van Shares you could be using!

Five or more people can form a Vanpool or Van Share. Vanpool participants share a flat monthly cost based on round trip distance and the number of people in the van. Van Share riders pay $185 each month, split among all riders. Gas, insurance and maintenance are all paid for both.

When you form a Vanpool, one person can act as driver and bookkeeper, but it’s nice if more people share these roles. You’ll enjoy discounted parking in some areas as well.

Van Shares are like Vanpools except they are limited to 20 miles round trip and must connect with transit, ferries, or trains for one leg of the trip. For example, you could use the Sounder commuter rail to arrive at King Street Station, and then pick up a Van Share in the garage and drive to your work outside of downtown.

RSO Vanpool Bike (48)

You can get help finding members for your van or attend a “ride share meetup” in your area this summer.

For more information on Vanpools and Van Shares, visit us here or call (206) 625-4500.

Mayor, City Announce Revised Transportation Levy to Move Seattle

On March 2, 2015, Mayor Ed Murray launched Move Seattle, a vision for transportation in our city for the next 10 years. Move Seattle connects and integrates existing plans for walking, biking, transit, and freight into a holistic 10-year strategy that will help the city meet present demands while also looking ahead to the future as we continue to grow

For the past year, the Mayor and SDOT have worked together to prepare a draft transportation levy proposal to replace the current transportation levy, called Bridging the Gap (BTG), that expires at the end of 2015. Approved by voters in 2006, BTG has helped address our maintenance backlog, increase transit reliability, and improve safety.

Mayor Murray announces the Levy to Move Seattle.

Mayor Murray announces the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle.

On March 18, Mayor Murray and SDOT unveiled the draft Transportation Levy to Move Seattle and began a citywide conversation about our next major investment in transportation.

The proposed 9-year, $900 million draft Transportation Levy to Move Seattle proposal aimed to:

  • Take care of the basics by paving streets, retrofitting bridges, and improving road safety
  • Invest in our transportation system to keep pace with our growing city
  • Improve safety and mobility for all travelers – people walking, biking, driving cars, moving goods, and taking transit
  • Contribute to an integrated and connected system that is easy-to-use, affordable, and convenient

Improvements proposed in the draft levy were organized around Mayor Murray’s vision for Seattle: a city that is safe, affordable, interconnected, and vibrant.

It was the City’s goal that this levy reflect the needs of our communities and improve the day-to-day realities of getting around a growing Seattle. To accomplish this, from mid- March through April 2015, SDOT and the Mayor’s Office engaged in a citywide outreach effort to better understand the public’s transportation priorities and receive feedback on the draft levy proposal.


The draft levy proposal was revised in early May to reflect community priorities communicated during the public engagement process.

Mayor Murray and SDOT released the revised levy proposal on May 6, 2015.

Mayor Murray presents revised proposal (upper left; clockwise as follows), Community supporters, SDOT Director Scott Kubly, Rebecca Saldana, Puget Sound Sage

Mayor Murray presents revised proposal (upper left; clockwise as follows); Community supporters; SDOT Director Scott Kubly with Kelly Aramaki, Seattle Public Schools; Rebecca Saldana, Puget Sound Sage with Councilmembers Tom Rasmussen and Mike O’Brien.

 

Reflecting Community Priorities

During the public engagement process, we heard that the people of Seattle view safety, particularly for people on foot and on bicycle, as a top priority. We also heard support for greater investments in transit reliability and access, improved connections to light rail, and making it safer and more comfortable for people to walk throughout Seattle. We have revised the proposal to reflect these community priorities.

The revised levy proposal that Mayor Murray will submit to City Council responds to community feedback by increasing funds for neighborhood priority projects, transit investments, and pedestrian safety and mobility. It would fund $930 million in investments over nine years – $30 million more than the draft proposal released in March. The additional funding would come from levy revenue growth caused by growth in Seattle property value and number of households. The final levy’s cost to taxpayers ($275 annually for the owner of a median value home) would remain the same as proposed earlier.

Once the levy legislation is submitted to City Council, SDOT and the Mayor’s Office will coordinate closely with Councilmembers as they review it and will continue to encourage community feedback on the proposal.

Learn more about the levy and share your feedback with us. There are many ways you can get involved in the discussion.

Questions? Contact Allison Schwartz, Levy Outreach Lead, at allison.schwartz@seattle.gov or (206) 386-4654

 

Chat with SDOT Director Scott Kubly to learn more and share your feedback on the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle

Join SDOT Director Scott Kubly for coffee and conversation in Fremont, Thursday afternoon:

 

Scott Kubly

Scott Kubly

Milstead & Co Coffee, 770 N 34th St  Thursday, 4/20, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a Calendar of Upcoming Events (calendar will continue to be updated):

  • 4/22/15 – Greater Duwamish Dist. Council 6:30 PM at Georgetown City Hall, 6202 13th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Southeast District Council 6:30 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Northwest District Council 7 PM at Greenwood Senior Center, 525 N 85th St
  • 4/23/15 – Coffee with Scott Kubly 1 – 2 PM at Milstead & Co Coffee, 770 N 34th St
  • 4/23/15 – Drop-in session 5 – 7 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/25/15 – U District Farmers Market 9 AM – 2 PM at University Way NE between 50th & 52nd
  • 4/26/15 – Fremont Sunday Market 10 AM – 5 PM at Corner of 3410 Evanston Ave North
  • 4/26/15 – Broadway Farmers Market 11 AM – 3 PM at Broadway Ave E and E Pine St
  • 4/26/15 – Ballard Farmers Market 10 AM – 3 PM at 5345 Ballard Ave NW
  • 4/26/15 – West Seattle Farmers Market 10 AM – 2 PM at California Ave SW & SW Alaska
  • 5/6/15 – Columbia City Farmers Market  3 – 7 PM at 37th Ave S and S Edmunds St

 

Mayor Murray announced a proposal last month for a nine-year, $900 million levy to replace the existing $365 million Bridging the Gap levy that expires at the end of 2015. The Transportation Levy to Move Seattle proposal focuses on taking care of the basics, maintaining our streets, bridges, and sidewalks, while also investing in the future with improvements that give us more transportation choices to move more people and goods in and around our growing city.

Mayor Murray announces Levy to Move Seattle

Since introducing the levy proposal, we’ve hosted three open houses in different parts of the city, and presented to numerous community and business organizations, as well as city advisory boards and commissions. We’ll continue these community briefings, and throughout April, will be hosting an additional round of opportunities for the public to learn about the proposal and provide feedback.

Share your input: Take this short survey to tell us what you think of the proposal and share your transportation priorities: www.moveseattlesurvey.com

http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/LevytoMoveSeattle.htm

 

Chat with SDOT Director Scott Kubly to learn more and share your feedback on the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle

Join SDOT Director Scott Kubly for morning coffee and informal conversation in South Park or online Monday evening:

Scott Kubly

Scott Kubly

  • Via Vadi Caffèe, 8600 14th Ave. S  Monday, 4/20, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.
  • Online Meeting from 6 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. Please Register at

 

 

 

 

Here is a Calendar of Upcoming Events (calendar will continue to be updated):

  • 4/19/15 – West Seattle Farmers Market 10 AM – 2 PM at California Ave SW & SW Alaska
  • 4/20/15 – Online Open House 6 – 6:45 PM – Register online, see above.
  • 4/20/15 – Coffee with Scott Kubly 8 – 9 AM at Via Vadi Caffee, 8600 14th Avenue S
  • 4/21/15 – Seattle Freight Advisory Board 9:30 – 11:30 AM at Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue Rm. L-280
  • 4/22/15 – Greater Duwamish District Council 6:30 PM at Georgetown City Hall, 6202 13th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Southeast District Council 6:30 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Northwest District Council 7 PM at Greenwood Senior Center, 525 N 85th St
  • 4/23/15 – Coffee with Scott Kubly 1 – 2 PM at Milstead & Co Coffee, 770 N 34th St
  • 4/23/15 – Drop-in session 5 – 7 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/25/15 – U District Farmers Market 9 AM – 2 PM at University Way NE between 50th & 52nd
  • 4/26/15 – Fremont Sunday Market 10 AM – 5 PM at Corner of 3410 Evanston Ave North
  • 4/26/15 – Broadway Farmers Market 11 AM – 3 PM at Broadway Ave E and E Pine St
  • 4/26/15 – Ballard Farmers Market 10 AM – 3 PM at 5345 Ballard Ave NW
  • 4/26/15 – West Seattle Farmers Market 10 AM – 2 PM at California Ave SW & SW Alaska
  • 5/6/15 – Columbia City Farmers Market  3 – 7 PM at 37th Ave S and S Edmunds St

 

Mayor Murray announced a proposal last month for a nine-year, $900 million levy to replace the existing $365 million Bridging the Gap levy that expires at the end of 2015. The Transportation Levy to Move Seattle proposal focuses on taking care of the basics, maintaining our streets, bridges, and sidewalks, while also investing in the future with improvements that give us more transportation choices to move more people and goods in and around our growing city.

Mayor Murray announces Levy to Move Seattle

Mayor Murray announces Levy to Move Seattle

Since introducing the levy proposal, we’ve hosted three open houses in different parts of the city, and presented to numerous community and business organizations, as well as city advisory boards and commissions. We’ll continue these community briefings, and throughout April, will be hosting an additional round of opportunities for the public to learn about the proposal and provide feedback.

 

 

 

Share your input: Take this short survey to tell us what you think of the proposal and share your transportation priorities: www.moveseattlesurvey.com

http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/LevytoMoveSeattle.htm

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What do you think about the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle?

Join SDOT Director Scott Kubly for coffee in the coming weeks to learn more and share your feedback on the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle. Lots of other opportunities to engage, as well.

Last month, Mayor Murray announced a proposal for a nine-year, $900 million levy to replace the existing $365 million Bridging the Gap levy that expires at the end of 2015. The Transportation Levy to Move Seattle proposal focuses on taking care of the basics, maintaining our streets, bridges, and sidewalks, while also investing in the future with improvements that give us more transportation choices to move more people and goods in and around our growing city.

Since introducing the levy proposal, we’ve hosted three open houses in different parts of the city, and presented to numerous community and business organizations, as well as city advisory boards and commissions. We’ll continue these community briefings, and throughout April, will be hosting an additional round of opportunities for the public to learn about the proposal and provide feedback.

 

Here are ways to participate:

  1. Take the survey (it is available in multiple languages) to share your transportation priorities at: www.moveseattlesurvey.com
  2. Participate in an online meeting where you’ll hear from SDOT Director Scott Kubly and have the opportunity to ask questions on Monday, April 20 from 6 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. Please click here to sign up.
  3. Join SDOT Director Scott Kubly for coffee and informal conversation at one of these local coffee shops:
  • Central District: Starbucks 2300 South Jackson on Monday, April 13, 2 to 3 p.m.
  • Chinatown/International District: Eastern Café 510 Maynard Ave S on Tuesday, April 14, 8 to 9 a.m.
  • Lake City: Kaffeeklatsch Seattle 12513 Lake City Way NE on Friday, April 17, 8 to 9 a.m.
  • South Park: Via Vadi Caffèe 8600 14th Avenue S on Monday, April 20, 8 to 9 a.m.
  • Fremont: Milstead & Co Coffee 770 N 34th St on Thursday, April 23, 1 to 2 p.m.

 

Also, be on the lookout for city staff providing information and seeking feedback around the city at farmers markets, community centers, and other public places. For the full list of engagement opportunities and more information on the levy proposal, visit www.seattle.gov/levytomoveseattle.

 

What’s next?

Mayor Murray will send his final proposal to the City Council in early May, and the Council will discuss the proposal and engage the public throughout the spring. For a levy to be considered for inclusion on the November ballot, the City Council will need to send a final proposal to King County by early August.

Your feedback now will help shape the Mayor’s final proposal. We encourage you to get involved – take the survey, join us for coffee, sign up for email updates, and learn more at www.seattle.gov/levytomoveseattle.

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If you have questions or feedback on the levy proposal, please contact SDOT’s Levy Outreach Lead Allison Schwartz at allison.schwartz@seattle.gov or (206) 386-4654.

Georgetown Bites Celebrates the Colorful Cuisine of Historic Georgetown Saturday 3/28

SDOT recently began work on Georgetown Festival Street. So what is a festival street? It’s a public place that has been designated for recurring temporary closure to vehicular traffic use for the purpose of pedestrian-oriented special activities.

The Georgetown Festival Street will be on 12th Avenue S between S Vale (All-City Coffee) and S Bailey Streets (at the end of the block – past the overpass). It will also include S Vale Street between 12th Avenue S and Airport Way S.

As you all might know the Georgetown industrial arts corridor is home to some of Seattle’s most distinguished culinary attractions. From boutique breweries to chocolate confections, decadent burgers to gourmet delis, soda fountains to yogurt factories, Seattle’s oldest neighborhood is also its most sumptuous.

Here’s a heads up on a Saturday event celebrating Georgetown:

Georgetown Bites: A Taste of Georgetown offers delicacies from 28 diverse drinking and dining establishments on Saturday, March 28 from 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM. For only $20 patrons can purchase five tickets redeemable for special offers throughout the neighborhood, Additional tickets are available for $5 each. Tickets will be sold at the Georgetown Bites booth at the Georgetown Trailer Park Mall from 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM the day of the event.

Gtown Bites

The food and hospitality industry played a pivotal role in Georgetown’s remarkable revitalization over the past decade. Early producer Georgetown Brewing (maker of the popular Manny’s Pale Ale) has been joined by Ellenos Yogurt and Fran’s Chocolates (favored by America’s first couple Barack and Michele Obama and celebrity chef Bobby Flay.) Pioneering dining and nightlife establishments like Jules Maes Saloon, one of the region’s oldest taverns, along with nearby Nine Pound Hammer, Stellar Pizza, and Smarty Pants have attracted a growing array of alluring restaurants, bars, and cafes including Zippy’s Burgers, Via Tribunali, Georgetown Liquor Company, Brass Tacks, Square Knot Diner, All City Coffee, Hallava Falafel, Flying Squirrel, Star Brass Lounge, Hitchcock Deli, and many more.

Georgetown Bites also marks the official groundbreaking for the Festival Street project, creating a pedestrian and arts friendly plaza in the heart of the Georgetown business district with funding from Seattle’s Bridging the Gap program. This attractive amenity will be christened at the 9th annual Georgetown Carnival arts festival on Saturday, June 13.

The public is invited to experience the historic Georgetown neighborhood while sampling some of Seattle’s most creative cuisine.  For a map of participating businesses and related information, visit: www.georgetownbites.com

Gtown Bites2

 

What Moves You, Seattle? Share Your Input on a New Transportation Levy Proposal

Seattle is one of the fastest growing cities in the country, and our transportation system is critical to our quality of life and economic vitality. Earlier this month, Mayor Ed Murray introduced Move Seattle — his ten-year transportation vision that integrates our long-term plans for walking, biking, transit, and freight and sets forth a holistic approach to meeting Seattle’s needs today and tomorrow.

To help make that vision a reality, the city will need to identify a replacement for the current Bridging the Gap levy that expires at the end of 2015. Today, Mayor Murray and SDOT Director Scott Kubly announced a proposal for a new levy the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle.

SDOT Director Scott Kubly  discusses the Levy to Move Seattle.

Mayor Murray and SDOT Director Scott Kubly (at podium) announce the Levy to Move Seattle.

The proposed nine-year, $900 million levy aims to take care of the basics by maintaining our streets, bridges, and sidewalks, while also investing in the future with improvements that give us more travel choices to move more people and goods in and around Seattle.

ltms_overviewnumbers

We’d like to get your input and reaction to this draft proposal before Mayor Murray sends it to the Seattle City Council in May. The City will need to submit a final levy proposal to King County by early August for it to be on the ballot in November 2015.

Your participation matters. Help shape our transportation future:

Visit www.seattle.gov/LevytoMoveSeattle to:

 

Attend an upcoming community conversation to talk directly with staff about the proposal and your transportation priorities:

Saturday, March 28:

  • New Holly Gathering Hall (7054 32nd Ave S, Seattle 98118): 10 AM –12 PM

 

Monday, March 30:

  • Roosevelt High School (1410 NE 66th St, Seattle 98115): 6 – 8 PM

 

Tuesday, March 31:

  • West Seattle High School (3000 California Ave SW, Seattle 98116): 6 – 8 PM

 

Learn more at www.seattle.gov/LevytoMoveSeattle

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23rd Avenue South and South Walker Street Area gets a Pedestrian-Friendly Makeover!

Pedestrians can now safely stroll along the east side of 23rd Avenue S between S College and S Waite streets, enjoying the new sidewalk, curb ramps, planting strips and trees (photo below).

23 Ave South - New Sidewalk

23 Ave South – New Sidewalk

Soon vehicles will also experience a smoother ride over the newly paved roadway along 23rd Avenue S in the same area. Over the past few months, SDOT has been working to install pedestrian and roadway safety improvements, to make the 23rd Avenue S and S Walker Street area more safe and comfortable for all modes of transportation.

To improve safety and access at street crossings the project installed a number of ADA compliant curb ramps along 23rd Avenue S, Rainier Avenue S and MLK Jr Way S and S Walker Street. Curb bulbs to improve visibility and reduce pedestrian crossing distance were installed on the east side of Rainier Avenue S and S Walker Street.

Additional segments of sidewalk were also installed on the south side of S College Street, from 23rd Avenue S to Rainier Avenue S and Rainier Avenue S between 23rd Avenue S and S Walker Street (see photo below).

South College Street - New Sidewalk

South College Street – New Sidewalk

The project will be completed over the next month as crews complete the installation of landscaping, curb ramps and signage.

Thank you for your patience during construction!

If you have any questions or comments about construction for this project, please email Alicia@stephersonassociates.com or call 206-615-1075.

For more about the project: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/23rdwalkerimprovements.htm

 

Move Seattle – Progressing towards the Seattle of tomorrow

What is Move Seattle?

Move Seattle is the Mayor and SDOT’s vision for how to integrate all of our planning for different travel modes into a holistic, 10-year strategic plan for transportation.  It builds from the Council-adopted modal plans, describing how they work together as a whole.  It includes strategic goals, near-term (3-year) and long-term (10-year) commitments for SDOT, and accountability measures, as well as a 10-year list of large capital project priorities. It is organized around Mayor Murray’s vision for Seattle as a safe, interconnected, affordable, vibrant and innovative city.

SDOT Director Scott Kubly, Mayor Ed Murray with community members at Move Seattle event.

SDOT Director Scott Kubly, Mayor Ed Murray with community members at Move Seattle event.

Delivering the following near-term actions in the next three years will help us meet our goals:

Roll out a coordinated Vision Zero program:

  • Implement 20 mph speed zones in residential areas on a neighborhood-by-neighborhood basis, starting with areas with the highest crash rates
  • Carry out 5 corridor safety projects, including on Rainier Ave S, 35th Ave SW, Lake City Way, and SW Roxbury St
  • Reduce arterial speed limits to 30 mph or lower to improve safety
  • Create a traffic safety education kit for community groups and schools to promote road safety and Vision Zero
  • Partner with Seattle Police Department to conduct routine enforcement in areas with high crash rates
  • Partner with SPD to install at least 12 new school zone cameras
  • Improve school walking routes at up to 12 locations and upgrade school zone signage at up to 15 locations each year

 

Repair critical infrastructure to increase safety:

  • Repair up to 25 blocks of damaged sidewalk each year
  • Complete construction of the Yesler Avenue over Fourth Avenue bridge replacement and begin construction of the seismic retrofit of the 45th Avenue Viaduct East Bridge Approach and the replacement of the Post Avenue Bridge
  • Begin seismic retrofit of Seattle’s remaining unreinforced bridges
  • Rehabilitate up to 5 stairways each year

 

Enhance mobility and access:

  • Synchronize the downtown signal system
  • Establish a 24-hour Traffic Management Center to better manage traffic and incident response 24/7
  • Implement adaptive signal control along the Mercer Corridor, Denny Way, and 23rd Avenue
  • Develop an iconic Seattle transit map to make Seattle’s transit system easier to understand
  • Expand Transit Screen displays to 20 buildings to improve access to transportation information
  • Partner to design and launch a real-time multimodal travel and wayfinding app

 

Improve transit and maximize bus service and ridership growth:

  • Implement “Always on Time” bus routes by focusing transit capital improvements on the routes that serve most Seattle residents
  • Ensure that 75% of Seattle households are within a 10-minute walk of bus routes with service every 15 minutes or better
  • Install red bus-only lanes and transit priority improvements at pinch points and implement targeted enforcement to ensure bus-only lanes operate effectively
  • Upgrade bus stops and stations by implementing a street furniture program and adding real-time information signs and better lighting to busy bus stops
  • Begin construction of bus rapid transit on Madison Street
  • Begin construction of the Center City Streetcar Connector and the Broadway Extension on Capitol Hill

Bump up Seattle’s bikeability:

  • Install 1,500 bike parking spaces over the next three years
  • Encourage businesses to install bike racks in the right of way and work with building owners to increase quality off-street bike parking
  • Enhance bicycle commute programs available to employees

 

How were the strategic goals in Move Seattle established?

The five strategic goals in Move Seattle are consistent with Mayor Murray’s vision for Seattle:  A safe city, and interconnected city, an affordable city, a vibrant city, and an innovative city.  The document discusses how SDOT’s actions and investments will advance those larger city goals.

How did you prioritize the projects in Move Seattle?

The Seattle Department of Transportation rigorously prioritizes the large capital projects it recommends to City Council and the Mayor as part of the budget every year. This same prioritization process was used for the projects in Move Seattle.  Looking at factors as diverse as safety data and economic development potential, critical maintenance needs and potential to improve key transit, bike or freight routes, a list of 17 large capital projects over the next 10 years is proposed in the plan.

What was the public process for Move Seattle?

Move Seattle is a mayoral initiative that builds on adopted City policy in the modal master plans and other documents, such as the Seattle Comprehensive Plan. While the Move Seattle initiative did not have an individualized public engagement campaign, the policies it integrates were all subject to extensive public feedback and Council adoption.

Is Move Seattle the same as a potential Bridging the Gap transportation levy renewal?

No. The vision outlined in Move Seattle is much broader than what can be achieved through a transportation levy and involves many different sources of funding including grants, partnerships and other revenues sources. A replacement source of funding for the Bridging the Gap levy will be necessary, but is not sufficient, to realize the full vision in Move Seattle. Staff at SDOT are working closely with the Mayor’s office on planning for a transportation levy, and will have more information to share on that separate subject in the coming weeks. For more information: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/moveSeattle.htm