Seattle Debuts Public Emergency Alert and Notification System, AlertSeattle

 

Seattle police officers, firefighters and emergency management staff will be out spreading the word about AlertSeattle, a new, real-time emergency alert and notification system. With AlertSeattle in place, Seattle now has a way to send out messages to the public with information on what to do when emergencies like earthquakes, explosions, flooding or other disasters happen. This system is free and available to anyone who lives, works, travels through or visits Seattle.

With AlertSeattle, individuals receive official communication directly from the City of Seattle and can customize what alerts they want to receive and how they want to be notified. Getting good information out quickly is critical during emergencies, and AlertSeattle is an excellent tool for people to stay informed.

In addition to emergency alerts, the public can also sign-up to receive community notifications about severe weather, safety, health, utility service disruptions, major traffic incidents, preparedness events and more.

To sign up go to: alert.seattle.gov and set up a user profile. All user information is private and will not be distributed in any manner. The service itself is provided by the City of Seattle at no cost; however, message and data rates may apply.

ALERTSeattle_620x170

Downtown Parking Tips to help navigate Summer activities!

If you’re heading down to the Seattle Waterfront to escape the heat this weekend, there’s a lot happening! Let SDOT help you out get on your way with quick and convenient parking options, thanks to e-park. These real-time parking signs let drivers know how many open spaces are available in their designated parking garage, and are located from the Waterfront to Pioneer Square. These signs can save drivers time and stress that accumulates the longer you circle the city while looking for parking.

Waterfront

For more parking options, you can also visit our partner DowntownSeattleParking.com online or download their mobile application.

Waterfront Parking

Now that you’ve got your parking figured out, be aware of several events happening on the waterfront this weekend.

Seafair Fleet Week and Boeing Maritime Celebration began on Wednesday with the Parade of Ships and continues this weekend with ship tours on Piers 66, 69, and 90 on Saturday from 9:30am-3:30pm and on Sunday from 12:30pm-3:30pm.This is a way to celebrate and honor members of our military.

The Annual Waterfront Whimsea Family Fun Day at Waterfront Park this Sunday from 11:00am-3:00pm which features an  attempt to set the world record for high fives in four hours—you are invited to join in and high five as creatively as possible, like with foam fingers and animal paws!

Here’s a link to our SDOT Parking Map.

As you enjoy all the Waterfront has to offer, remember to drive carefully, stay cool, and have fun!

Traveling in Rainier Valley is About to Become Safer and Easier

Want to help make Rainier Valley a safer and more mobile place to live and work? Join SDOT at our open house on July 30 from 7-9 pm to learn about the projects improving the way people live and travel.

The meeting will be held at the Rainier Community Center on 4600 38th Avenue South. Interpreters in Cambodian, Vietnamese, Tagalog, Somali, Amharic, Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese and Oromo will be present, along with treats and child care.

At the open house, we’ll share updates on current projects and the results of intensive data collection and public input on how to make Rainier Avenue South operate more safely for all travelers. We will also facilitate questions and field answers and comments to reflect the priorities of the Rainier Valley community.

RansportinRainierValley

Click to Enhance

With the help of the public’s feedback and use of data we are taking steps to achieve Seattle’s Vision Zero goal of eliminating traffic deaths and serious injuries. Working in Rainier Valley is one way we hope to improve the lives of all who value this neighborhood. Once completed, these projects will make it easier and safer for people to walk, bike, ride transit and drive in the area.

Key projects that we will discuss include:

Rainier Valley North-South Neighborhood Greenway

We’re excited to unveil the most promising route for this neighborhood greenway Construction is scheduled to begin in 2016. The greenway extends six miles from Rainier Beach to the I-90 trail through a series of streets with slower posted speed limits. This route provides additional connections to existing greenways and one under construction. It will also create a bicyclist and pedestrian friendly solution to community destinations such as parks, schools and stores. . Check out a map of the route and recommended safety improvements on our project page: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/rainiervalleygreenways2.htm

Accessible Mt. Baker

This project is currently studies ways to implement safety improvements for those using the Link light rail station and traveling through the Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Rainier Avenue South intersection. The project encompasses a long-term multimodal approach that is consistent with the North Rainier Neighborhood Plan. Some of the proposals under consideration include restoring historic boulevard connections, creating additional links to parks and recreational areas, as well as maintaining unique cultural and community elements. For more information: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/accessibleMtBaker.htm

Rainier Avenue South Road Safety Corridor

Once this project is built, people who travel along this busy street will notice safety enhancements and increased traffic predictability. Using tools like retimed traffic signals and pedestrian enhancements will help us address current behavioral issues like people speeding, or driving distracted. The project limits extend along Rainier Ave S from Charlestown St to Seward Park Ave S with construction planned for this year. For more information: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/rainieraves.htm

An open house meeting for the Rainier Avenue South Road Safety Corridor in February 2014

An open house meeting for the Rainier Avenue South Road Safety Corridor in February 2014

We hope to see you there!

 

How the S Hinds Street Stairway improves biking connections

Biking between Rainier Valley and Lake Washington is now a lot easier thanks to the new bicycle “runnel” built by SDOT crews at S. Hinds Street and York Road S. stairway. Stairway runnels create an easier way for bicyclists to push bikes up or down a staircase in a channel (like a concrete rain gutter) on the side of the staircase. This can save bicyclists injury from slinging their bike over their shoulder to climb stairs. The new stairway runnel (as seen on the left side of the photo) features a handrail for the runnel user, which also delineates the space for pedestrians.

S. Hinds Street stairway: before (left) and after (right)

S. Hinds Street stairway: before (left) and after (right)

These improvements are part of SDOT’s Stairway Maintenance and Repair Program. The S. Hinds Street stairway is one of more than 500 stairways owned and maintained by SDOT’s Roadway Structures Division. Learn more about SDOT’s stairways and upcoming repair projects by visiting http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/stairways.htm.

PARK(ing) Day 2015 applications are being accepted!

Imagine the following: mini golf in the streets of Pioneer Square, a library of banned books curbside in Ballard, and nearly 40 feet of space for playing cornhole on a downtown street. These installations—not to mention dozens of other spaces for art, public seating, and play—were all part of last year’s PARK(ing) Day, and we’re now accepting applications to create your own pop-up park for the 2015 event!

On the third Friday in September each year, Seattle raises awareness about the importance of creating a walkable, livable, and healthy city by participating in the international PARK(ing) Day event. During this event, artists, activists, and community members convert on-street parking spaces throughout Seattle into public, temporary mini-parks. For PARK(ing) Day 2015, fun and interactive parks will be installed and staffed by groups throughout the city on Friday, September 18.

Do you have work or school during the day? We want everyone to be able to participate in PARK(ing) Day this year, so we’ve extended the hours to 10 am – 7 pm to allow more people to see the pop-up parks in their neighborhood!

PARKing Days

Started in 2005 by San Francisco design firm Rebar, PARK(ing) Day has quickly become a widespread event globally. Community groups in over 160 cities in 35 countries have participated in the event’s efforts to encourage a sustainable urban environment. 2015 marks the ninth year Seattle has participated in PARK(ing) Day.

 

If you are interested in creating your own park for PARK(ing) Day, we encourage you to submit a free application to SDOT. Applicants can choose to install a park on an arterial street (two mid-block spaces required) or a residential street (one mid-block space required). The application (quick and easy to complete!) must be submitted to David.Burgesser@seattle.gov by August 28.

PARKing DaysFor more information about PARK(ing) Day in Seattle please visit www.Seattle.gov/transportation/seattleparkingday.htm where you can find the design guidelines, application, and photos from past PARK(ing) Days and more.

 

Keeping Pedestrians Safe in Ballard at NW 65th Street and 18th Avenue NW

Early in 2015 SDOT completed another innovative project to improve pedestrian safety near the Salmon Bay School at NW 65th Street and 18th Avenue NW in Ballard. This project is another effort to help us achieve our Vision Zero goal, to end traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2030. .

New Curb ramps and RRFB at NW 65th and 18 Ave NW near Salmon Bay Elementary

New Curb ramps and RRFB at NW 65th and 18 Ave NW near Salmon Bay Elementary

The work at this intersection involved new curb ramps, curb bulbs, sidewalks repairs, and finally solar-powered Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacons (RRFB), signals that help pedestrians cross streets safely. An on-street bicycle corral was also installed adjacent to the school.

65th St at 18 ave

This project improves pedestrian, vehicle, and road sign visibility, thereby increasing awareness of pedestrians, vehicles, and bicyclists to one another. The solar-powered RRFBs are a sustainable yet environmentally friendly alternative. This approach to provide power to the crossing beacons is helping ensure the longevity and reliability of the signals for years at a lower cost.

 

This intersection improvement was funded by Seattle’s Safe Routes to School program. To learn more about this and other Safe Routes to School projects, please click here.

Join us at the Center City Bike Network Open House tonight!

Please join us tonight for the Center City Bike Network open house to meet the project team and share your vision for the project.

Tuesday, July 21, Town Hall Seattle at 1119 8th Ave from 5:00 – 7:00 PM

  • Learn the history and next steps in the selection and design process
  • Share specific input as well as your vision for a more vibrant city and safer traveling experience for people walking, biking and driving downtown
  • We’ll have activities for kids too!

The Seattle Department of Transportation is studying and prioritizing locations for a protected bicycle lane network in downtown Seattle. This work builds on outreach and data collected as part of Seattle’s 2014 Bicycle Master Plan. SDOT plans to implement the Center City Bike Network of protected bike lanes by 2020, pending funding availability.

ccb2015_0701_project_map

Why Protected Bike Lanes?

U.S. cities are increasingly embracing protected bike lanes that separate people on bikes from people in cars by using physical barriers such as posts, parked cars or simple landscaping.
Seattle’s downtown network of protected bike lanes aims to:

  • Improve safety and predictability by separating all modes of travel
  • Expand connectivity throughout downtown and the rest of Seattle as our city continues to grow
  • Boost business by offering more travel options for getting to them
  • Promote physical activity and increase ridership by supporting people of all ages and abilities
  • Provide affordable travel options

 

Design that Builds on Best Practices

Like all good transportation systems, protected bike lanes require smart investments and careful planning. SDOT will use a combination of technical analysis, ongoing public input and coordination with projects such as the Center City Connector streetcar and Waterfront Seattle to design and phase-in cost-effective complete streets that are a win-win for everyone.

Outreach Process

Below is our outreach process for implementing bicycle projects (Bicycle Master Plan, page 94). This project primarily focuses on step 2, helping us prioritize the network and move through a portion of its design. Seattle has an ambitious schedule for implementing protected bike lanes in the Center City. Check out our five-year implementation plan.

As a part of the outreach for the project, SDOT has developed a Sounding Board made up of community members representing businesses, freight, people who bike, private development and residents. Learn more about the Sounding Board here.

Get Involved

Better bike infrastructure can benefit everyone especially when various perspectives are involved in the planning. SDOT is seeking input and guidance from people who live, travel and work downtown and in adjacent neighborhoods.

Outreach will include open houses, briefings, regular email updates, and a Sounding Board made up of Center City stakeholders.

Click here to sign up for email updates.

Project Contacts

Project Email: CCBike@Seattle.gov
SDOT Project Manager: Sandra “Sam” Woods
SDOT Communications Lead: Dawn Schellenberg

Traffic safety improvements at 47th Avenue SW and SW Admiral Way now complete

Update: Here is a brief video of SDOT Director Scott Kubly chatting about the safety improvements made at 47 Ave SW and SW Admiral Way in West Seattle.

 

Over the last four months, crews working for the Seattle Department of Transportation constructed the 47th/Admiral Signal project, a set of improvements supported by many in the community. On Tuesday, July 14, SDOT Director Scott Kubly joined Councilmember Tom Rasmussen, the Admiral Neighborhood Association (ANA) and community members to commemorate the project’s completion. Community members gathered for an event on the street corner in front of Alki Mail & Dispatch on a sunny summer evening.

Admiral Way Safety

David Whiting ANA, Councilmember Tom Rasmussen, SDOT Dir.Scott Kubly and community members join to celebrate safety completion, artist reveals sidewalk art display.

SDOT partnered with the ANA and Alki Mail & Dispatch to host this completion event. Tuesday’s event provided an opportunity to thank committed community members who have been involved over the years and remember former Councilmember David Della’s aide, Matthew “Tatsuo” Nakata, who was struck and killed at the location while crossing the intersection in 2006. Former Councilmember Della attended the event and was grateful for the safety project’s completion and the community support at the event.

To commemorate the project and the collective effort that went into making the traffic safety improvements a reality, the ANA commissioned artist Peregrine Church, of Rainworks, to create a concrete stencil for two of the sidewalk corners. These stencils only appear when wet and Tuesday’s event concluded with an unveiling of Church’s work.

These improvements are a part of Seattle’s Vision Zero plan to improve safety for all roadway users. Just a few months ago, this winding and steep five-way intersection was equipped with a flashing overhead pedestrian beacon and one striped crosswalk. Now, the intersection of 47th Avenue SW and SW Admiral Way is equipped with a full traffic signal, five striped crosswalks, upgraded curb ramps to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards and will soon have a center left-turn pocket. Residents and travelers in the area will continue to see safety improvements as the SW Admiral Way Safety Project gets underway.

We appreciate the community’s patience and ongoing support while we worked to complete this project.

First Hill Streetcar Testing Update

Here is a video clip of the Test Run:

The new First Hill Streetcar visited all its neighborhoods from Capitol Hill to Pioneer Square on Tuesday as part of its ongoing testing program. These low-speed tests focused on the braking performance when traveling downhill in traffic. Many of our tests are performed late at night or on the 8th Avenue S maintenance facility track–some will even be performed with the new car delivered to the South Lake Union line–but this was a nice opportunity to show off for the lunchtime crowd on a sunny July day!  We are working hard with the manufacturer to get the vehicles ready for passenger service. The start date is still not fixed as we need the manufacturer to complete this iterative process of testing and fine-tuning to safety-certify the vehicles before we can finalize our start-up activities.

Test Team in Pioneer Square

Test Team in Pioneer Square

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Test Team completed the tests and will be back out soon. #TheStreetcar

The First Hill Streetcar is an important link in the regional transit system, and connects the diverse and vibrant residential neighborhoods and business districts of Capitol Hill, First Hill, Yesler Terrace, Central Area, Chinatown ID and Pioneer Square. For more on the streetcar please visit: www.seattlestreetcar.org

Come share your ideas for the Center City Bike Network 7/21 at Town Hall

What’s your vision for a more vibrant city and safer traveling experience for people walking, biking and driving downtown? Please join us for the Center City Bike Network open house to meet the project team and share your vision for the project.

Tuesday, July 21 at Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave, from 5:00 – 7:00 PM

  • Learn the history and next steps in the selection and design process
  • Share specific input as well as your vision for a more vibrant city and safer traveling experience for people walking, biking and driving downtown
  • We’ll have activities for kids too!

 

The Seattle Department of Transportation is studying and prioritizing locations for a protected bicycle lane network in downtown Seattle. This work builds on outreach and data collected as part of Seattle’s 2014 Bicycle Master Plan. SDOT plans to implement the Center City Bike Network of protected bike lanes by 2020, pending funding availability.

ccb2015_0701_project_map

Why Protected Bike Lanes?

U.S. cities are increasingly embracing protected bike lanes that separate people on bikes from people in cars by using physical barriers such as posts, parked cars or simple landscaping.
Seattle’s downtown network of protected bike lanes aims to:

  • Improve safety and predictability by separating all modes of travel
  • Expand connectivity throughout downtown and the rest of Seattle as our city continues to grow
  • Boost business by offering more travel options for getting to them
  • Promote physical activity and increase ridership by supporting people of all ages and abilities
  • Provide affordable travel options

 

Design that Builds on Best Practices

Like all good transportation systems, protected bike lanes require smart investments and careful planning. SDOT will use a combination of technical analysis, ongoing public input and coordination with projects such as the Center City Connector streetcar and Waterfront Seattle to design and phase-in cost-effective complete streets that are a win-win for everyone.

Outreach Process

Below is our outreach process for implementing bicycle projects (Bicycle Master Plan, page 94). This project primarily focuses on step 2, helping us prioritize the network and move through a portion of its design. Seattle has an ambitious schedule for implementing protected bike lanes in the Center City. Check out our five-year implementation plan.

As a part of the outreach for the project, SDOT has developed a Sounding Board made up of community members representing businesses, freight, people who bike, private development and residents. Learn more about the Sounding Board here.

Get Involved

Better bike infrastructure can benefit everyone especially when various perspectives are involved in the planning. SDOT is seeking input and guidance from people who live, travel and work downtown and in adjacent neighborhoods.

Outreach will include open houses, briefings, regular email updates, and a Sounding Board made up of Center City stakeholders.

Click here to sign up for email updates.

Project Contacts

Project Email: CCBike@Seattle.gov
SDOT Project Manager: Sandra “Sam” Woods
SDOT Communications Lead: Dawn Schellenberg