Madison Street Bus Rapid Transit Design Input Open House Dates: August 3, 4, 9  

Please join SDOT at upcoming open houses to learn more about Madison Street Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), which will begin construction in 2018. SDOT has worked closely with the community to design Madison Street BRT and is continuing to seek community input. Madison Street BRT will provide high-frequency, fast, reliable, and safe public transportation between First Ave and Madison Valley.

At the open houses, the public is encouraged to speak with SDOT staff and provide feedback on the updated design, including roadway and station designs, along with access improvements planned along the corridor. Open house dates are:

  • Wednesday, August 3 

5-7 p.m.

Seattle University, Campion Ballroom

914 E Jefferson St

  • Thursday, August 4

11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Town Hall

1119 8th Ave

  • Tuesday, August 9

5-7 p.m.

Meredith Mathews East Madison YMCA

1700 23rd Ave

 

To give feedback online, visit MadisonBRT.participate.online from August 2-16.

Madison Street BRT will serve the Downtown, First Hill, Capitol Hill, Central Area, and Madison Valley neighborhoods. The project will improve transit access on the corridor, especially for neighborhoods south of Madison Street that may have fewer transit options.

Madison Street BRT is the first of seven new RapidRide lines to be delivered in Seattle as part of the voter-approved Levy to Move Seattle. Service on Madison Street is anticipated to begin in 2019.

Find out more about Madison Street BRT at http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/MadisonBRT.htm.

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Night Out: Not Your Everyday Block Party

Next week is the national Night Out celebration – but it’s more than just a block party. Night Out is an annual event designed to heighten crime prevention awareness, increase neighborhood support in anti-crime efforts, and unite our communities. Night Out is the first Tuesday in August and has been a Seattle tradition for 32 years. 

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Neighbors at Night Out set up tables and chairs on residential streets to share food, play street games and music and get to know one another.

Two Ways to Get Your Block Party Permitted

On any other day of the year, a block party street closure would be permitted through SDOT, but on the first Tuesday of August every year, block party street closures are arranged through the Seattle Police Department. Why? Because it is national Night Out!

Night Out Block Party

  • Allows you to close your residential block to cars from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. on August 2, 2016 only.
  • Permits are available through the Seattle Police Department.
  • This permit is FREE.
  • Register your Night Out block party until August 1.
  • Request visits from the Police Department, Fire Department, or Office of Emergency Management to your block party to share safety and emergency-preparedness information.

Neighborhood Block Party

  • Allows you to close your non-arterial block to cars during daylight hours any day of the year.
  • Permits are available through SDOT.
  • This permit is FREE.
  • You need to apply for this permit at least 2 weeks in advance of your event.

More Opportunities to Play in the Streetsummer streets parklet

Throwing a block party is a fun opportunity to meet and play with your neighbors in the street. Check out some of SDOT’s other public space programs:

Play Streets allow you to host recurring street closures under a single permit. Want to host a weekly street soccer game? A monthly potluck or chalk art party?  The Play Streets program is for you!  Check out this new program that makes it easy to use your street as playful space for people. Apply at least 2 weeks before you want to close your street. Permit is free.

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PARK(ing) Day Plus+  (September 16-17, 2016) What if you could turn a parking space into a park? Put café tables in front of your favorite business? Create a temporary bike lane?  For two days in September, you can!  If you are working with your neighbors on a project for PARK(ing) Day you may want to plan to finalize your design at your Night Out block party on Tuesday, August 2, so you can meet the permit application deadline on August 5. Permit is free.

Check out our previous post on PARK(ing) Day Plus+ here.

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Two Weeks Left to Apply for PARK(ing) Day Plus+ Permits!

Only two weeks left to reserve your space for PARK(ing) Day Plus+!

PARK(ing) Day Plus+ Permit applications and Small Sparks Grant applications are due by Friday, August 5, for the event on Friday and Saturday, September 16 and 17.

You’ll want to get started now, because:

  • To apply, you need to know which parking spaces you plan to use and you have to submit details of your plan, including a sketch.
  • If you want to apply for a Small Sparks grant, the application process can take up 48 hours once you register before you can apply.

Now is the time to gather your team of friends, neighbors and colleagues to reimagine your street! A temporary park?  A street safety improvement? What would a walkable, livable, and healthy city look like on your block?

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Looking for more details or inspiration? Check out the PARK(ing) Day Plus+ Guidelines or SDOT’s flickr album for some fun examples. PARKing day

More about Seattle’s PARK(ing) Day Plus+:

  • Plus+ 2 days of fun
    • This year, we extended the event into two days – Friday September 16, and Saturday, September 17. Participate either day, or both!
  • Plus+ Temporary street improvements
    • In addition to pop-up parks, you can test out temporary bike lanes or sidewalks to enhance the walking and biking environment.
  • Plus+ Small Sparks grants
    • We’re partnering with Department of Neighborhoods to offer funding through the Small Sparks grant program. You can apply for up to $1,000 to support a project or event that helps build stronger and healthier communities. Contact NMFund@seattle.gov to learn more.

See our previous post about PARK(ing) Day in Seattle here.  Remember to submit your permit application to David.Burgesser@seattle.gov by August 5!

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Take Advantage of Summer by Biking or Walking to Work

Summer is upon us, and it’s an excellent time to consider commuting by bike or walking.

Golden Gardens is the perfect place to play on a sunny summer day

Golden Gardens is the perfect place to play on a sunny summer day

Getting out of the car can be good for our environment, good for your health, and may even help your mood by avoiding the road rage which impacts 8 out of 10 drivers.

If you already commute by transit, add a little extra time outdoors by going to the next bus stop before boarding, or getting off one stop early. You might also consider a combination bike – bus commute: ride your bike to the bus stop, use transit for the longest leg of your commute, and then ride the last mile to work.

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You can even help Seattle stay one of the most walkable cities in the country by checking out our draft Pedestrian Master Plan update and giving us your feedback by August 12!

Do you need help planning your route? We can help! Check out:

Start out small and work your way up to more frequent and longer trips. Identify the important transition points in your commute where one mode may present greater efficiency over another. It won’t be long before you develop a flexible commute that will maximize your effort and minimize your commute times.

Seattle summers include rain, but don't let that stop you

Seattle summers include rain, but don’t let that stop you

By the time Labor Day rolls around, you’ll be a commuter pro!

Post by Commute Trip Reduction

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How do the Fremont and Ballard Bridge Openings work?

Here’s a behind-the-scenes look at the Fremont and Ballard Bridge openings, and how they work with our latest Blog Video:

(Click on 1080p HD in Settings to view in High Definition)

SDOT operates and maintains over 149 bridges throughout Seattle, including four movable bridges. Three of SDOT’s movable bridges are draw bridges, known as bascule bridges. These are the Ballard Bridge, Fremont Bridge and University Bridge.

The city is required to open the bridges to marine traffic when requested, but is allowed to restrict boat and marine traffic openings during the morning
(7-9 a.m.) and afternoon (4-6 p.m.) commutes on weekdays (except national holidays). The openings average about four minutes, from stopping traffic to letting traffic resume. SDOT appreciates the public’s patience during the openings as marine traffic passes through.

The Ballard Bridge, located at the west end of the Lake Washington Ship Canal at Salmon Bay, is the fourth and last of the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridges to be passed before entering Puget Sound from Lake Washington. Built in 1917 with a length of 2,854 feet, the Ballard Bridge links the Magnolia and Queen Anne neighborhoods with Ballard.

The Fremont Bridge crosses the Lake Washington Ship Canal and connects the Fremont and Queen Anne neighborhoods. The bridge opened on July 4, 1917, it is the only blue and orange bridge operated by SDOT. The Fremont Bridge’s current color was chosen by a 1985 poll taken among Fremont residents and the Fremont Arts Council.

The Fremont Bridge also connects the Lake Washington Ship Canal Trail to the Burke Gilman Trail and has one of Seattle’s nine bike counters (here’s our previous blog about the Fremont Bridge Bike Counter and how it works). The Fremont Bridge has celebrated over 610,000 openings and counting as of January 2016. The bridge sits just 30 feet above the water, and rises for marine traffic on average of about 35 times a day, making it as one of the busiest bascule bridges in the world.

Here’s a link to our SDOT Bridges page: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/bridges.htm

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Share Your Ideas for Pike Street on June 14 from 5-7 p.m.

Have thoughts about how Pike St could look and feel? Maybe you’ve got some ideas about what could happen in the street to make it better to move, hang out, and interact.

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Your Design Input Wanted for the South Lander Street Bridge Project

SDOT is going ahead with plans to build a bridge over South Lander Street between 1st and 4th avenues south to improve traffic, rail operations, and safety in the SODO neighborhood. At this early phase in the design process, we want to hear from you.

Learn more about the project and share feedback on key design features at our South Lander St Bridge Project Open House on Wednesday, June 8, 2016, from 4 to 6 p.m. at Metropolist located at 2931 1st Ave S in Seattle.

If you can’t make it to this Open House, you can visit our online open house, available from June 6 -17 at landerbridge.participate.online.

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South Lander St includes a crossing of four railroad tracks, which creates safety risks and traffic delays.

South Lander St is an essential east-west corridor in Seattle’s SODO neighborhood. Every day, the street serves freight, commuters, pedestrians, and bicyclists, as well as King County Metro buses and the Port of Seattle.

The corridor includes a crossing of four railroad tracks, which pose a safety risk and can cause traffic delays. Train crossings result in the road being closed more than 4.5 hours per day, impacting the mobility of tens of thousands of people and severely affecting access to port and local manufacturing facilities. South Lander St creates direct connections to facilities critical to our economy at the Port of Seattle, which contribute to 75,000 existing jobs and an additional 25,000 jobs that are forecasted by 2040.

The project may sound familiar – it went through preliminary design in 2007, but was put on hold. Thanks to the voter-approved Levy to Move Seattle, this project is moving forward again. Our transportation system has changed since 2007 and SDOT engineers are reevaluating the project’s previous design concepts to ensure the safest and most effective solution. 

For more information about the S Lander St Bridge Project, visit the project website. Email lander_bridge@seattle.gov to join our email list.

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City Offices are closed for the Memorial Day Holiday

City of Seattle offices will be closed in observance of Memorial Day. On-street parking is free in Seattle on Monday, May 30 for the Memorial Day holiday.

Pvt. Brian Engelhard, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) places American flags at Arlington National Cemetery during “Flags in,” May 21, 2015. (Courtesy Arlington National Cemetary)

Pvt. Brian Engelhard, 3d Infantry Regiment, places American flags at Arlington National Cemetery May 21, 2015. (Courtesy Arlington National Cemetery)

Monday is a federal holiday in which we honor the those who have died while serving in the United States military. Originally Memorial Day began as an event honoring Union soldiers who had died during the American Civil War.  After World War I, it was extended to include all men and women who died in any war or military action. Initially titled Decoration Day, after World War II the day became known as Memorial Day.

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New Vision Zero Dashboard Coming Soon!

Vision Zero is excited to have worked closely with the University of Washington Information School  to make collision data more interactive and accessible to everyone.  Educating people about what is happening in their neighborhood and citywide streets is one of the key elements to making Vision Zero successful.  Collision data is also one of the driving factors that we use to determine the engineering treatments and level of investments we make towards a safer transportation infrastructure.

Last night at the UW Information School Capstone event, more than 300 students presented on projects where they were presented with a problem and developed a solution to an information challenge for a client in a community.

New Dashboard

Currently, many years’ worth of collision data is publicly available at data.seattle.gov  and the Vision Zero dashboard is currently located in performance.seattle.gov

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The new website will be available soon for everyone to use and learn more about the police reported collisions that have happened in your area.  Here’s a preview of what’s to come:

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Vision Zero Logo

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Welcome to the SDOT Sign Shop!

Our dedicated SDOT sign shop staff invited us in to see all the different things they do to help travelers find their way and keep us all going in the right direction.

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Meet Robin Ford. He has been the Crew Chief for the City of Seattle sign shop for about a year. Ford’s crew (all three of them!) produces all of the signs in our city. The signs they create range from street name and traffic control, to those custom designed “welcome to the neighborhood” signs. His team focuses on providing the city with a fast turn-around on production.

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The old process for manufacturing the signs was to screen print them onto metal or wood. Screen printing was useful for bulk production, but the process took time. Each pigment needed to be laid onto the design one at a time. Once the design was printed onto the material, setting the signs aside to set took about 1-2 hours. Ford hasn’t screen printed in 6 months. IMG_3010IMG_3013

Today, they use digital printers and plotters for a speedier method of production. The digital printers use an adhesive material for easier application. UV coating is then placed over the designs to secure its longevity. These printers also allow printing on reflective material, warranted for 10 years.

Plotters cut designs out of vinyl materials to be placed on the metals.

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Here’s a link to our previous post about sign replacement: http://sdotblog.seattle.gov/2014/11/24/bridging-the-gap-2014-signage-work-nearly-complete/.

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The next time you’re driving, walking, or taking the bus through our streets, stop to admire the work of our sign shop crew. If you want to view other photos that were taken on this tour, check out out Flickr.

Have you ever wondered what SDOT does with those old street names signs? Wonder no more! As noted in previous blog posts, various street name signs – named and numbered – are available through the City of Seattle Fleets and Facilities surplus warehouse.  An updated list of available signs ranging in price from $5 – 15 is posted on the web. Please see details and contact the warehouse directly if you are interested in purchasing a sign. Holiday shopping? The signs are great gifts for the person who has everything in life or is looking for a new creative project!

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