Big infrastructure for the Seawall Project is installed at Waterfront Park

If you haven’t visited the waterfront recently, you might notice some changes near Waterfront Park as the Seawall Project continues construction. Over the next few weeks, large sections of the new seawall will be installed in this location. This location is adjacent to Waterfront Park, which provides a unique opportunity to view seawall construction up close. Stop by and see this once-in-a-lifetime project unfold.

Onlookers peer through the fence to view seawall construction at Waterfront Park

Onlookers peer through the fence to view seawall construction at Waterfront Park

Face panels are in place at Waterfront Park

Last week, the seawall face panels were installed at Waterfront Park. The new face of the seawall includes different texture designs that provide a surface for algae and other marine organisms to attach, providing food for migrating salmon.

A new face panel is lowered into place at Waterfront Park. Each panel weighs 18,000 pounds!

A new face panel is lowered into place at Waterfront Park. Each panel weighs 18,000 pounds!

The new seawall face panels installed at Waterfront Park feature a cobble stone design.

The new seawall face panels installed at Waterfront Park feature a cobble stone design.

 

 

 

 

Marine mattress installation this week

Marine mattresses will be installed later this week in front of the new seawall adjacent to Waterfront Park. These rectangular, plastic mesh bags filled with stone provide an improved, shallow nearshore habitat for migrating salmon and other marine life. With light filtering down to the water through the new glass blocks in the sidewalk overhead, these marine mattresses will promote the growth of vegetation along this corridor as well.

Marine mattresses were installed south of Colman Dock last winter.

Marine mattresses were installed south of Colman Dock last winter.

Each marine mattress is constructed off-site, and the mesh bags include several compartments that are filled with various-sized rocks which provide a more favorable substrate for habitat growth. The plastic mesh is hand-braided together to close the bags, and then the marine mattresses are trucked to the site for installation.

Left – stones are scooped into the marine mattress mesh bags; Right – once full, a worker hand-braids the mesh bag closed.

Left – stones are scooped into the marine mattress mesh bags; Right – once full, a worker hand-braids the mesh bag closed.

Next up – Zee panels

After the face panels and marine mattresses are in place, the zee panels will be installed. These large, zee-shaped concrete panels will hold the sidewalks that contains the embedded glass blocks. Get a sneak peek at this work by watching this video of zee panel installation south of Colman Dock!

Zee panels have been precast off-site and are ready to be installed at Waterfront Park.

Zee panels have been precast off-site and are ready to be installed at Waterfront Park.

For more information about seawall construction, visit the Seawall Project website. If you have questions, email (seawall@waterfrontseattle.org) or call the 24-hour hotline 206-618-8584.

New Bike Leaning Rails and Improvements Installed at Burke-Gilman Crossing!

Hey Bikers and Trail Users,

The new Bicycle Leaning Rails have been installed at 25th Avenue NE and NE Blakeley Street along the Burke-Gilman Trail crossing, and are ready to use!

These rails and foot rests allow riders to rest an arm and/or foot when waiting at the trail intersection. Crews working for SDOT began installing the foot rests and rails last week in addition to the new wider bike-and-pedestrian friendly Curb Ramps. Please check out our latest Blog Video below:

Improvements to this intersection include:

  • Upgraded curb ramps to be compliant with current Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards.
  • Signal modifications for the new protected bicycle/pedestrian phase for the south crossing on the Burke-Gilman Trail with bicycle icon signal heads and push buttons are in the works and are expected to be finished by the end of March.
  • Signal modifications to accommodate a new right-turn only pocket and protected turning phase on the west side of the intersection for eastbound motorists on NE Blakeley Street are also in the works and are expected to be finished soon.
New Bike Leaning Rail open and being used.

New Bike Leaning Rail open and being used.

New Wider ADA Curb Ramps.

New Curb Ramps at 25th Avenue NE and NE Blakeley Street.

 

The Bike Leaning Rails are already used in places like Copenhagen, Denmark and Chicago, and allow bicyclists to rest their foot and have something to hold onto for balance while waiting at the traffic light rather than using traffic light posts or other poles around them.

 

 

The rails also help align bike riders to one side of the trail so the sidewalk is kept clear for pedestrians, making it safer for all to cross the street.

We’ve also made improvements to the intersection of 30th Avenue NE and the Burke-Gilman Trail by building a raised crosswalk that alerts drivers of this crossing with the intent of slowing vehicle speeds. Raised crosswalks also help improve visibility between motorists and pedestrians and help maintain a level crossing for people biking, walking or with disabilities.

Crew Adrian and Jonathan Install Leaning Rail.

Installation Crew Adrian and Jonathan set new Leaning Rail.

This project is the first of its kind in Seattle; SDOT will be evaluating potential future sites.

Biker and Signs KeeperYou can learn more about this project by visitingwww.seattle.gov/transportation/UnionBlakeleyImprovements.htm.

SDOT WMBE Program holds Working with SDOT 101

Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) held its first session of the Working With SDOT 101 Outreach Event series on February 10, which is held quarterly at the Seattle Municipal Tower. The first session brought over 40 Women- and Minority-owned Businesses (WMBEs) together with a dozen SDOT staff members to share information on how to find contracting work with the City of Seattle. Highlights of the event included an hour-long networking session between firms and staff, and technical assistance for the Seattle Online Business Directory.

SDOT WMBE Advsor Edson Zavala facilitates "Working With SDOT 101" Outreach Event

SDOT WMBE Advisor Edson Zavala facilitates “Working With SDOT 101″ Outreach event.

SDOT WMBE Program Outreach session

SDOT WMBE Program Outreach session.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Seattle Department of Transportation’s Women- and Minority-owned Business Enterprises (WMBE) Program promotes equity in contracting through the inclusion of small and historically underutilized businesses on transportation projects. Mayor Murray affirmed the City of Seattle’s commitment to promote race and gender equity in contracting through Executive Order 2014-03 Equity in City Contracting.

The Executive Order directs departments to “Increase the opportunities for women and minority owned businesses (WMBEs), and to provide a welcome and responsive environment for all businesses that support such efforts.” The SDOT WMBE Program promotes the participation of women and minority owned businesses (WMBEs) on department contracts, fosters internal support for the program, and facilitates outreach within the community to increase WMBE inclusion.

WMBE Program Crew working on SDOT project.

WMBE Program Crew working on SDOT project.

This event is the first in a series of targeted outreach initiatives for SDOT to increase the inclusion of WMBE firms. To learn more about the SDOT WMBE Program, please visit our website at: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/wmbe.htm.

Happy Lunar New Year! Seattle Streetcar Stations Highlight Cultural Heritage of Chinatown-International District

Spring arrived early in Chinatown-International District this week! Just in time for Lunar New Year, three Seattle Streetcar stations sprouted bold flowers and graceful icons symbolizing the neighborhood’s cultures:

  •  5th & Jackson, Japantown – Cherry Blossom symbolizes the ephemeral nature of life; Daruma doll represents good luck in reaching a goal, Koi fish symbolizes good fortune, and Crane signifies good fortune and longevity.
5th and Jackson Street Station - Cherry Blossom

5th and Jackson Street Station – Cherry Blossom

  • 7th & Jackson, Chinatown – Chrysanthemum is native to China; Bat symbolizes good luck, LionDog wards off evil spirits, and medallion represents good fortune.
7th and Jackson Street Station - Chrysanthemum

7th and Jackson Street

7th and Jackson Street

7th and Jackson Street Station – Chrysanthemum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • 12th & Jackson, Little Saigon – Hoa Mai flower is popular in Vietnam during Lunar New Year; Tiger represents stability and strength, Ox means good luck and good health, and Turtle symbolizes heaven and earth.
13th and Jackson

13th and Jackson Street Station – Hoa Mai flower

 

13th and Jackson Station - Hoa Mai flower

13th and Jackson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Local design firm TMarks Design created these colorful graphics in collaboration with local business owners, residents and SDOT. The station installations are one of the more visible steps toward the start of service on the First Hill Streetcar Line, a new urban mobility option funded through Sound Transit’s “ST2” mass transit expansion plan.

The First Hill Streetcar will support economic growth and strengthen connections among the places where people live, work and socialize. It will be an important link in the regional transit system, and will connect the diverse and vibrant residential neighborhoods and business districts of Capitol Hill, First Hill, Yesler Terrace, Central Area, Chinatown ID and Pioneer Square. The first completed car for the new line is expected to be delivered to the Streetcar Operations & Maintenance Facility on February 27. After delivery, components removed for shipping will be re-installed, and all of the systems will be re-tested before the car is approved for testing on city streets. See www.seattlestreetcar.org for regular updates on the streetcar start-up process.

Newest Parklet opens tomorrow at 1:30 p.m. at Uptown SIFF Cinema at 511 Queen Anne Ave N.

Seattle’s sixth  and newest parklet opens tomorrow, Saturday Feb. 21 at 1:30 p.m. at the Uptown SIFF Cinema at 511 Queen Anne Ave N. Mayor Murray and SDOT Director Scott Kubly will join the parklet hosts and others from the community for the grand opening and a special announcement about the future of parklets in Seattle. We’d love to see you there, so plan to swing by to check out the new parklet and share some coffee and snacks. The parklet will feature colorful seats, a mini-library, and bike parking and is located at Queen Anne Avenue North and Republican Street.

The Uptown Parklet is now under construction

The Uptown Parklet is now under construction

Our newest parklet is hosted by the Uptown Alliance, and will be the sixth installed in Seattle. Parklets are small community gathering spaces built in a couple of on-street parking spots and are a cost-effective way to activate streets, create more vibrant neighborhoods, and promote economic vitality.

This rendering gives an idea of what you can expect to see on February 20.

This rendering gives an idea of what you can expect to see on February 21.

Are you interested in hosting a parklet? Well, you’re in luck! We’ll have much more to share about the next phase of the program—including a brand-new twist on parklets—on February 21.

Curious how well parklets are working in Seattle? Check out some of the data we’ve gathered throughout the pilot program:

Parklet Program data

Parklet Program data

For more information on the Seattle Parklet Pilot Program: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/parklets.htm

“Performance Seattle” Goes Live at Mayor’s State of the City Address

The City of Seattle and the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) in addition to other city departments has launched a new tool called Performance Seattle, a new internet site dedicated to connecting citizens and the city departments.  Mayor Murray announced this week during his “State of the City” address that the city is implementing the new online dashboard, which uses performance data from nine initial contributing departments to help Seattle’s citizens and stakeholders monitor the City’s progress towards many performance-oriented goals.

The site can be found at: https://performance.seattle.gov/ and besides “Transportation” the dashboard includes categories for “Public Safety”, “Utilities & Environment”, “Housing, Human Services & Education”, “Community & Economic Development”, and “Operations & Innovation”.  As can be seen below within the “Transportation” category, the site has been configured so that there are three sub-categories for which SDOT data is shown:  “Mobility”, “Roads”, and “Safety”.

New "Performance Seattle" Online Dashboard

New “Performance Seattle” Online Dashboard

Performance Seattle is set up to be very interactive and it is easy to drill down into the data by clicking on one of the blue goal tiles (as shown above).  As an example, the cut shot below shows how the “Repair potholes quickly” goal tile can be explored further.  The viewer is shown the goal, the data feeding into the goal, the importance of the goal, and how SDOT is performing in meeting the goal.

SDOT Goal Tile data example

SDOT Goal Tile data example

Notably, SDOT was the pioneering department in developing this city-wide dashboard concept, with the Mayor’s Office incorporating many of the features of SDOT’s original site as Performance Seattle began to take shape over the course of the latter part of 2014 and early 2015.

SDOT will work with the Mayor’s Office in the future on Performance Seattle content, which will likely evolve over time with goals being added and/or taken away as department and Mayoral priorities change.  It’s worth noting that we’re stepping up our performance reporting efforts internally as well, looking for ways to integrate the use of performance data into our everyday work as we continually strive to deliver service in the most efficient and effective ways possible.

Another Parklet in Opening in Seattle…And Big Program News on February 21

Mark your calendar now—Seattle’s sixth parklet will open in Uptown at SIFF Cinema at 511 Queen Anne Ave N, on Saturday, Feb. 21 at 1:30 p.m. Mayor Murray and SDOT Director Scott Kubly will join the parklet hosts and others from the community for the grand opening and a special announcement about the future of parklets in Seattle. We’d love to see you there, so plan to swing by to check out the new parklet and share some coffee and snacks. The parklet will feature colorful seats, a mini library, and bike parking and is located at Queen Anne Avenue North and Republican Street.

The Uptown Parklet is now under construction

The Uptown Parklet is now under construction

Our newest parklet is hosted by the Uptown Alliance, and will be the sixth installed in Seattle. Parklets are small community gathering spaces built in a couple of on-street parking spots and are a cost-effective way to activate streets, create more vibrant neighborhoods, and promote economic vitality.

This rendering gives an idea of what you can expect to see on February 20.

This rendering gives an idea of what you can expect to see on February 21.

Are you interested in hosting a parklet? Well, you’re in luck! We’ll have much more to share about the next phase of the program—including a brand-new twist on parklets—on February 21.

Curious how well parklets are working in Seattle? Check out some of the data we’ve gathered throughout the pilot program:

Parklet Program data

Parklet Program data

For more information on the Seattle Parklet Pilot Program: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/parklets.htm

SDOT Crews Taking (and Building) Steps to Reconnect Neighborhoods Update!

Back in December we shared our first SDOT video post featuring SDOT crew (Kurt and Brett) working hard to replace and build a new stairway that would reconnect South Grand Street from Bradner Place at the top of the hill to South Grand at 28th Avenue South.  The stairway is now open and permanent steel handrails will be installed soon.

Now neighbors and families with children can easily get to and from Bradner Gardens Park and the community P-Patch above the stairway to the east, to nearby Colman Playground and other nearby parks below the stairway to the west. This and other SDOT projects are working to improve the infrastructure, and enhance mobility throughout the city.

Stairway1

New Stairway Facing East

 

New Stairway facing West

New Stairway facing west

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s the original video post from December:

The original stairway was built in the 1930’s and was steep, narrow, and overgrown with trees and bushes making it look like what was described as a “hobbit hole”.

The task of making a new wider stairway that is up to modern code required clearing the overgrown tree canopy above and around the entrance at the top, demolishing and recycling the old stairway, and then widening the path, then creating a landing after the first twenty steps to project the stairway out from the hillside which decreased the angle and steepness of the stairway.

Stairway Pix 4

New stairway – in progress

SDOT carpenters Kurt and Brett are part of two person crews who work on these projects from start to finish. This involves clearing of foliage, demolition, engineering and framing of the new stairway for concrete pouring, and building the rails to ensure a safe, accessible new stairway.

Stairway Pix 8

Stairway before

Stairway Pix 2

Stairway in progress

The Bradner Place stairway project started in November and is expected to be completed by February, we’ll bring you an update once it completed.

Stairway Pix 3

You’re Part of Access Seattle

Have you heard of Access Seattle? You’ve likely seen its results in the form of better access around construction sites, with much of the assessing and coordinating done before construction begins. The effort to keep Seattle mobile and thriving during construction booms involves the Construction Hub Coordination Program and works in part because of you —  eyes on the street.

Site Coordinators are out regularly in the hub areas, partnering with Street Use inspectors across the city, to identify and help resolve infractions and hazards. More identified hubs are expected soon, but SDOT’s Street Use staff respond to access concerns regardless of location. Many concerns are raised by you – the collective community experiencing construction impacts where you live, work and travel. To collaborate more with you, save the email SDOTConstructionHub@Seattle.gov to your mobile phone and email when/if you see things like the examples below. If the area in question is not in a currently identified Hub, we’ll let our inspectors know what’s up!

Poor signage and pathways near 1601 N 34th Street

Poor signage and pathways near 1601 N 34th Street

Idling

Unpermitted queuing on 11th Avenue in Capitol Hill

 

SafetyHazard

Unapproved traffic control near 1414 10th Avenue on Capitol Hill

All of the infractions shown above were rectified by the Access Seattle team–Construction Hub staff and Street Use inspectors–from requiring long-idling construction vehicles to leave unpermitted areas to issuing citations and working with the contractor to immediately improve the traffic control set-up. Some fixes are small, like adjusting sidewalk signage to clear the pedestrian pathway (see below) that that the first photo in our story depicts.

Pedestrian pathway cleared, near 1601 N 34th Street

Pedestrian pathway cleared, near 1601 N 34th Street

Pedestrian safety is a priority, with our Access Seattle staff always working to improve pathways.

N Northlake Place near 1601 N 34th St

N Northlake Place near 1601 N 34th St

Pedestrian pathway installation where fencing at 665 King St had blocked access

There are of course many examples of great construction site management and contractor efforts to lessen the impacts of their work on the community. We’ll talk about that in weeks to come, along with more infraction highlights and their remedies.

 

In the meantime, know that Access Seattle is always working for you, negotiating for things like better pedestrian access when a project proposes closing sidewalks entirely; bringing multiple projects together to talk about ways to contribute to neighborhood needs, like street parking; or arranging for methods to improve project sites to lessen negative impacts like littering and tagging.

 

As you can imagine, there are a lot of sites across Seattle needing TLC/enforcement, but we’re also trying to build capacity to respond. Our small but nimble team is on it, and looking to grow with you.

City of Seattle Seeks Proposals for Coordinated Street Furniture Program

The Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) is seeking to improve the streetscapes of downtown Seattle and South Lake Union, and has issued a request for proposals (RFP) for a Coordinated Street Furniture Program. The program’s goal is to enhance the public right of way through high quality street furniture and a higher level of maintenance while also improving pedestrian circulation and safety.

Qualified companies are invited to offer their proposals for the design, fabrication, supply, installation, operation, maintenance and repair of coordinated street furniture located in the public right of way in downtown Seattle and South Lake Union.

The City expects the Coordinated Street Furniture Program will provide:

Kiosk Example elsewhere - (not intended to represent design or potential advertising in Seattle).

Kiosk Example elsewhere – (not intended to represent design or potential advertising in Seattle).

  • An enhanced public realm experience for pedestrians, transit riders and visitors.
  • Improved comfort and usability of public gathering spaces, transit stops and stations, and public information systems, such as wayfinding.
  • A new variety of publicly accessible facilities and removal of “clutter” in the public realm.
  • Ongoing maintenance and cleanliness of all street furnishings in the program and areas around those furnishings.
  • A share of created advertising revenue to support further streetscape enhancements, center city transportation projects, safety upgrades or other needs.

 
The Coordinated Street Furniture Program may include, but is not limited to, transit shelters, informational kiosks, consolidated refuse receptacles and seating elements. If approved by the Seattle City Council, limited advertising may be permitted on selected street furniture.

Information Kiosk example elsewhere - not intended to represent design or potential advertising in Seattle.

Information Kiosk example elsewhere – (not intended to represent design or potential advertising in Seattle).

Transit Shelter Example elsewhere - (not intended to represent design or potential advertising in Seattle).

Transit Shelter Example elsewhere – (not intended to represent design or potential advertising in Seattle).

 

The program would provide new street furnishings and amenities in downtown Seattle and South Lake Union in addition to direct revenue to the City. The program vendor would maintain the furnishings as well as the streetscapes surrounding them, which would generate cost savings for the city and, possibly, for King County Metro as well. A coordinated street furniture program has the potential to generate $4-7 million of new revenue annually.

As part of this program, the City seeks exceptional design quality that complements the urban environment, functionality of the elements, and safe and accessible placement of street furniture. All elements of the Coordinated Street Furniture Program will occupy public space and will be maintained and serviced by the successful vendor. The full request for proposal can be found at:  http://thebuyline.seattle.gov/.