Chat with SDOT Director Scott Kubly to learn more and share your feedback on the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle

Join SDOT Director Scott Kubly for morning coffee and informal conversation in South Park or online Monday evening:

Scott Kubly

Scott Kubly

  • Via Vadi Caffèe, 8600 14th Ave. S  Monday, 4/20, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.
  • Online Meeting from 6 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. Please Register at

 

 

 

 

Here is a Calendar of Upcoming Events (calendar will continue to be updated):

  • 4/19/15 – West Seattle Farmers Market 10 AM – 2 PM at California Ave SW & SW Alaska
  • 4/20/15 – Online Open House 6 – 6:45 PM – Register online, see above.
  • 4/20/15 – Coffee with Scott Kubly 8 – 9 AM at Via Vadi Caffee, 8600 14th Avenue S
  • 4/21/15 – Seattle Freight Advisory Board 9:30 – 11:30 AM at Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue Rm. L-280
  • 4/22/15 – Greater Duwamish District Council 6:30 PM at Georgetown City Hall, 6202 13th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Southeast District Council 6:30 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Northwest District Council 7 PM at Greenwood Senior Center, 525 N 85th St
  • 4/23/15 – Coffee with Scott Kubly 1 – 2 PM at Milstead & Co Coffee, 770 N 34th St
  • 4/23/15 – Drop-in session 5 – 7 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/25/15 – U District Farmers Market 9 AM – 2 PM at University Way NE between 50th & 52nd
  • 4/26/15 – Fremont Sunday Market 10 AM – 5 PM at Corner of 3410 Evanston Ave North
  • 4/26/15 – Broadway Farmers Market 11 AM – 3 PM at Broadway Ave E and E Pine St
  • 4/26/15 – Ballard Farmers Market 10 AM – 3 PM at 5345 Ballard Ave NW
  • 4/26/15 – West Seattle Farmers Market 10 AM – 2 PM at California Ave SW & SW Alaska
  • 5/6/15 – Columbia City Farmers Market  3 – 7 PM at 37th Ave S and S Edmunds St

 

Mayor Murray announced a proposal last month for a nine-year, $900 million levy to replace the existing $365 million Bridging the Gap levy that expires at the end of 2015. The Transportation Levy to Move Seattle proposal focuses on taking care of the basics, maintaining our streets, bridges, and sidewalks, while also investing in the future with improvements that give us more transportation choices to move more people and goods in and around our growing city.

Mayor Murray announces Levy to Move Seattle

Mayor Murray announces Levy to Move Seattle

Since introducing the levy proposal, we’ve hosted three open houses in different parts of the city, and presented to numerous community and business organizations, as well as city advisory boards and commissions. We’ll continue these community briefings, and throughout April, will be hosting an additional round of opportunities for the public to learn about the proposal and provide feedback.

 

 

 

Share your input: Take this short survey to tell us what you think of the proposal and share your transportation priorities: www.moveseattlesurvey.com

http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/LevytoMoveSeattle.htm

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In Lake City, Pedestrian Safety and Stormwater Solutions go hand-in-hand

Polluted stormwater is a big problem. Much of the pollution in Puget Sound comes from runoff that starts in our neighborhoods. Rain gardens and other green stormwater infrastructure help slow down and clean stormwater runoff before it reaches our streams, lakes and Puget Sound.

Example of Ballard neighborhood rain garden

Example of Ballard neighborhood rain garden

Project to improve safety and help protect Thornton Creek

In the Lake City neighborhood, SDOT is working closely with Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) to build new pedestrian safety improvements and rain gardens that will clean and slow stormwater, reducing the pollutants that reach Thornton Creek and Puget Sound.

The Plan:

The project is located along 30th Avenue NE. It is currently in early design and includes:

  • A new sidewalk, curb and gutter along the east side of 30th Avenue NE between NE 130th Street and NE 137th Street.
  • New rain gardens between the sidewalk and road in the same area.

SPU will work with SDOT to build and maintain the rain gardens. Construction may begin as early as 2016, pending grant funding.

The Benefits:

Sidewalk and drainage improvements such as rain gardens provide safer, more comfortable and accessible sidewalks, reduce polluted stormwater runoff, and make walking and biking more pleasant. Building a sidewalk on 30th Avenue NE is a high priority because it is currently difficult to walk along and cross the road. Many people in the area depend on walking as a form of transportation.

This project would help protect Thornton Creek from polluted stormwater runoff. Currently, when rain falls on roads, parking lots and rooftops, it cannot soak into these hard surfaces. Instead it flows across them, picking up a variety of pollutants (oil, grease, heavy metals, pesticides) along the way. The rainwater – now called polluted stormwater runoff – carries the pollutants downstream to Thornton Creek and ultimately Puget Sound. Rain gardens, like those already constructed in several Seattle neighborhoods, are proven technologies for managing stormwater.

Learn more

If you would like to learn more about the project please contact:

Maribel Cruz, Public Information Officer Maribel.Cruz@seattle.gov

Want to know more about green stormwater solutions?

Reminder for tonight’s “Where are We Going”? forum at 6 p.m. featuring Janette Sadik-Khan, former Transportation Commissioner of New York City.

 

Janette Sadik-Khan

Janette Sadik-Khan

Transportation remains one of the most important civic issues in the Puget sound, and this lecture will explore potential future transportation options for the Seattle area. Drawing on her expertise as  will describe potential challenges to changing our city’s infrastructure, and offer a glimpse at what the future of regional transportation could hold. This discussion, moderated by KUOW’s Ross Reynolds, will also offer Sadik-Khan’s analysis of opportunities for improvement in transportation planning.

April 15 at 6 p.m. “Changing Lanes:  Blueprints for a New Road Order”

  • Guest Speaker: Janette Sadik-Khan of Bloomberg Associates, former NYC Transportation commissioner under Mayor Bloomberg
  • Moderator:  Ross Reynolds, KUOW Public Radio
  • Great Hall at Town Hall – 1119 Eigth Avenue

Speaker-Series-Banner

The Where are we Going? speaker series will generate excitement and conversation around potential futures for transportation in Seattle. From March to June, four national and international speakers will visit Seattle and will use demographic trends, lessons learned from other cities, and advances in technology to educate the general public and media on unique challenges and opportunities of planning for transportation. This series will provide an opportunity for civic-minded and engaged individuals to learn new ways of thought in transportation, while also attracting new voices to the conversation.

For more information: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/SpeakerSeries/default.htm

Sponsors: Seattle Department of Transportation, Office of Arts & Culture, KUOW

April 15 at 6 p.m.“Changing Lanes: Blueprints for a New Road Order” featuring Transportation Expert Janette Sadik-Khan

The second of four Transportation Forums features Janette Sadik-Khan, former Transportation Commissioner of New York City.

Janette Sadik-Khan

Janette Sadik-Khan

Transportation remains one of the most important civic issues in the Puget sound, and this lecture will explore potential future transportation options for the Seattle area. Drawing on her expertise as  will describe potential challenges to changing our city’s infrastructure, and offer a glimpse at what the future of regional transportation could hold. This discussion, moderated by KUOW’s Ross Reynolds, will also offer Sadik-Khan’s analysis of opportunities for improvement in transportation planning.

April 15 at 6 p.m. “Changing Lanes:  Blueprints for a New Road Order”

  • Guest Speaker: Janette Sadik-Khan of Bloomberg Associates, former NYC Transportation commissioner under Mayor Bloomberg
  • Moderator:  Ross Reynolds, KUOW Public Radio
  • Great Hall at Town Hall – 1119 Eigth Avenue

 

Please register for this free event at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/changing-lanes-blueprints-for-a-new-road-order-with-janette-sadik-khan-tickets-16006792748

Speaker-Series-Banner

 

The Where are we Going? speaker series will generate excitement and conversation around potential futures for transportation in Seattle. From March to June, four national and international speakers will visit Seattle and will use demographic trends, lessons learned from other cities, and advances in technology to educate the general public and media on unique challenges and opportunities of planning for transportation. This series will provide an opportunity for civic-minded and engaged individuals to learn new ways of thought in transportation, while also attracting new voices to the conversation.

For more information: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/SpeakerSeries/default.htm

Sponsors: Seattle Department of Transportation, Office of Arts & Culture, KUOW

SDOT is Installing 10 New Taxi Stands and Wants Your Location Suggestions

SDOT is installing 10 new taxi stands through 2015 and we’re looking for input on where they should go. Taxi stands are dedicated curb spaces where only taxis can wait. Taxi stands are a predictable way for people to know where they can catch a taxi downtown and throughout the city’s neighborhoods. If you have ideas on new locations for taxi stands, there are two ways that you can provide input. Please select whichever option is easiest for you. Please checkout our latest Blog Video below.

Possible New Taxi Stand additions available to Ballard and South Lake Union neighborhoods

New Taxi Stand additions available to Ballard, South Lake Union and other neighborhoods

You can suggest a new taxi stand location using this map. The map includes the existing taxi stand locations in red. To suggest a new location:

  1. Zoom into the location
  2. Click the Editor Button in the top left
  3. Click on the taxi symbol  on the left
  4. Click on the map where you would like to recommend a new taxi stand
  5. Fill in the information in the pop-up box to tell us why you’re recommending this location.
  6. When finished, click on the small “x” in the upper right corner of the pop-up box to save your recommendation on the map

 

If you’d prefer to send your ideas directly, you can also contact Kiersten Grove at kiersten.grove@seattle.gov or call 206.684.4653. Please include the street name, the nearest cross street, and which side of the street you’d suggest.

We’re asking for suggestions by April 20, and after that we can begin looking into the feasibility of specific locations.  We’ll follow up with additional communication throughout the spring and will be installing the new taxi stands in the summer. Thanks for taking the time to share your ideas!

Seattle is Growing…and so is Access

Seattle is booming. Right now there are approximately 100 active and upcoming construction projects in downtown; 129 current and upcoming projects across four hub areas outside of city center; and one very busy Access Seattle team.

 

The effort that began nearly one year ago is a big step for the City of Seattle—managing construction impacts holistically across all projects, public and private. That big step has met with appreciation, profound need and budget approval to hire a third site coordinator.

 

The Access Seattle Construction Hub Coordination program kicked off in 2014 with two site coordinators: Ken Ewalt and Wayne Gallup. They meet regularly with contractors, area residents and business owners to identify and resolve construction conflicts. They’ve become pretty well-known as hard-working honest guys dedicated to problem solving—from collaboration and guidance to enforcement and follow through. Joining them just this week is Jack Bighorse, direct from private sector work as the resident engineer for the Mercer West Project.

3Coordinators

 

Jack Bighorse is new to SDOT but not new to the work. For Mercer West he was responsible for coordinating all private and public projects in and around the site. He has 20+ years of construction management and inspection services experience and has worked on numerous projects including the SR 99 Bore Tunnel, I-90 Homer Hadley Bridge, Sound Transit I-5 Pike/Pine and the Alaskan Way Viaduct Tunneling project. Suffice it to say he can hit the ground running and we may quite literally need that—it’s busy out there!

 

The Access Seattle Site Coordinators are working to be single points of contact for efficient, clear communication. Some businesses have told us they’ve come to see Ken and Wayne as family, working together for fair results. Now, just as we welcome Jack to the fold, Wayne will be out for one month to spend time with his family out of state. So we’re not quite at 3…but we will be by April 27, 2015. In the meantime, welcome Jack; be aware that Jack and Ken will be sharing duties across all hubs the next four weeks; and let us know what questions you have about our growing team and critical effort to limit cumulative construction impacts. You can reach us at: SDOTConstructionHub@seattle.gov

 

If you’re not very familiar with Access Seattle and its Construction Hub Coordination Program, check out some of these blog posts. Keep reading and we’ll keep working to Move Seattle!

SDOT Grants for Projects that Encourage Walking and Biking to School

Did you know SDOT’s Safe Routes to School program provides funding to any K-12 public school, private school, non-profit, or PTA for projects that encourage kids to walk or bike to school safely? The Mini Grant program has been supporting grass-roots efforts at increasing safe biking and walking since 2009.

Take, for example, Denny International Middle School’s Bike to School program. Last year the Denny PTSA hosted donut and fruit days for kids who biked to school, handed out lights, reflectors and gloves during the winter months to keep kids safe on their bikes, kept kids hydrated with water bottles during warmer months, and made sure kids knew how to bike safely all year round by broadcasting safety information.

Last May the PTSA hosted their annual Denny-Lincoln Classic family bike ride and doubled their attendance! They handed out snacks and student-designed t-shirts to all participants and made sure to give each bike a thorough check through the A (air), B (brakes), Cs (chains). The student bike riders wound their way through the neighborhood down to Lincoln Park and were joined by the West Seattle Bike Connections group, Denny M.S. staff, and Principal Jeff Clark. The ride ended with a barbeque and prizes at the park. What a fun day!

Safe routes

Denny International Middle School students/staff joined by West Seattle Bike Connections group.

If you have a great idea you’d like to make a reality at your school, we can help you make it happen. There are two chances every year to apply for funding: April and October. The application is simple, just tell us what you plan to do and how that will improve safety at your school and encourage more kids to bike and walk. Send in a letter of support from the school principal and your application is complete!

For more information visit: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/ped_srts_grant.htm. For questions, contact ashley.harris@seattle.gov or 206-684-7577.

Vision Zero Pedestrian Safety Patrols Have Begun

The City of Seattle’s Vision Zero efforts are underway.  The Seattle Police Department has begun pedestrian safety patrols on Lake City Way NE as part of the Lake City Way Traffic Safety Project and Vision Zero. Safety Patrols will occur in the heart of Lake City between roughly NE 120th Street and NE 130th Street. 

Lake City Way NE near NE 127th

Lake City Way NE near NE 127th

Officers will focus on the mid-block crossings just north and south of the intersection of Lake City Way and NE 125th Street. The location was selected based on the number of total collisions that occur in this area which is busy with pedestrian, transit, bicycle and vehicular traffic. SDOT recently enhanced these crossings with rapid flashing beacons through the Lake City Way Traffic Safety Project. These beacons provide an increased awareness to drivers that pedestrians are in the crosswalk and that drivers should stop.  

Lake City Way SDOT Cam facing southbound

Lake City Way SDOT Cam facing southbound

Enforcement will also focus on behaviors that are most commonly associated with pedestrian collisions and target people that fail to yield to pedestrians. Officers will be on the look out for other behaviors that commonly lead to trouble on Lake City Way including speeding and distraction.

This effort is part of our ongoing work to enhance safety on Lake City Way. Travelers can expect to see increased law enforcement on Lake City Way today and throughout 2015. We’ve partnered with the Washington State Patrol to help monitor conditions on this busy northeast Seattle corridor. SPD will continue these patrols citywide through our Vision Zero enforcement efforts.

Remember always stop for pedestrians in the crosswalk. It’s the law and it’s the Lake City Way. 

Thank you for supporting safety.

Vizion Zero

LCW1 (2)

 

Enforcement to Protect Pedestrians

Access Seattle is working to keep businesses thriving, travelers moving and construction coordinated during the City’s continued construction boom. Besides getting public and private projects in hub areas to start collaborating, we’re working to ensure contractor compliance across the city. One recent example opened up a pedestrian pathway on Greenwood Avenue North.

Before

Permit inspectors saw unpermitted use of the site, blocking travelers from walking through the area around 14307 Greenwood Avenue N. The team met with the contractor to not only insist on safe pedestrian passage and a smaller project site footprint per established permits, but also to collect several thousand dollars in fines for outstanding issues. Needless to say, the site is now in much better shape.

After