Madison Corridor Bus Rapid Design Options Open House Wed. 5/6 @ 5-7pm

Please join Madison Corridor Bus Rapid Design Options Open House on Wednesday, May 6, 5 – 7 PM. The presentation starts at 5:30 p.m.

Where: Seattle Academy of Arts & Sciences, Middle School Jaffe Room at 1432 15th Avenue (Enter off of 15th Avenue, south of Pike Street)

The Madison BRT project is an opportunity to provide neighborhoods with a faster, more reliable transit connection to key destinations, enhance walking conditions and the streetscape along Madison, and identify an alternate bike facility to be built as part of the project.

Please join your neighbors to review design options, discuss benefits and trade-offs, and provide your input on priority elements for the project.  SDOT would like your input on:

  • BRT design options, routing, terminals, and station locations
  • Priorities for transit service and capital investments
  • Design concepts for a Central Area protected bike lane

Madison BRT

Metro bus service provides close connections to the Seattle Academy of Arts & Sciences, Middle School via Routes 10 and 11 (Pine and 15th Ave), Route 2 (Union and 14th /16th ), and Route 12 (Madison and 15th Ave stop).  For bicyclists, the closest bike parking is on the west side of the Bullitt Center at 15th and Madison, just north of the Seattle Academy of Arts & Sciences, Middle School.

You can learn more about the project at http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/madisonBRT.htm. If you have any questions or comments, feel free to contact Sara Walton at madisonbrt@seattle.gov or (206) 386-4645

Metro and SDOT planning “Rideshare Meetups!” to promote Neighborhood Carpooling

To help more Seattle residents get connected with carpooling and vanpooling options, King County Metro and the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) are hosting more than a dozen Rideshare Meetups! in six Seattle neighborhoods this spring and summer, including events in your neighborhood.

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SDOT and Metro Rideshare

At Rideshare Meetups! Commuters will be able to learn more about how carpooling and vanpooling can help save time, money, and stress on their commute, meet other commuters in their neighborhood, and sign up for ridesharing programs.  SDOT and Metro staff are available to answer questions and help residents sign up. People who start a new vanpool or join an existing vanpool will also receive a $50 gift card.

King County Metro has the largest vanpool program in the nation and continues to expand each year. Our website has more information about upcoming events and vanpooling and carpooling programs.

Here are the Rideshare Meetup locations:

  • Wednesday, May 6, 4:30–6:30 p.m. at Cafe Turko in Fremont, 754 North 34th St., Seattle
  • Wednesday, May 13, 4:30–6:30 p.m. at Buckley’s Queen Anne in Interbay, 232 First Ave. West, Seattle
  • Thursday, May 14, 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. at Lunchbox Labarotory in South Lake Union, 1253 Thomas St., Seattle
  • Tuesday, May 19, 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. at Pecos Barbeque Pit in SoDo, First Ave. S. Seattle
  • Wednesday, May 27, 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. at North Seattle College in Northgate, 9600 College Way N., Seattle.
  • Tuesday, June 9, 4:30–6:30 p.m. at Watershed Pub & Kitchen in Northgate, 10104 Third Ave. NE, Seattle
  • Thursday, June 18, 7:30–9:30 a.m. at Portage Bay Café in South Lake Union, 391 Terry Ave. N., Seattle
  • Wednesday, June 24, 7:30–9:30 a.m. at Yellow Dot Café, in Fremont, 701 N 34th St, Seattle
  • Thursday, June 25, 7:30–9:30 a.m. at F5 Networks in Interbay, 401 Elliott Ave. W., Seattle
  • Tuesday, June 30, 4:30–6:30 p.m. at Henry’s Tavern in SoDO, 1518 First Ave. S., Seattle
  • Thursday, July 9, 4:30–6:30 p.m. at Garage on First Hill, 1130 Broadway, Seattle
  • Thursday, July 16, 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. at McKinstry in SoDo food truck tour, 5005 Third Ave. S., Seattle,
  • Thursday, July 16, 1–2 p.m. at Sur La Table, SoDo food truck tour, 5701 Sixth Ave. S., Seattle
  • Thursday, July 16, 2:30–3:30 p.m. at K2 Sports, SoDo food truck tour, 4201 Sixth Ave. S., Seattle

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Spring is in full swing and SDOT crews are out cleaning, mowing, pruning and microsurfacing

Crews have been busy throughout the city getting things spruced up as we all ready for warmer weather. Right now, crews are working hard at locations all over the city so that Seattle’s landscapes are maintained and preserved as summer approaches.

SDOT Crews mowing, pruning, cleaning and paving.

SDOT Crews mowing, pruning, cleaning and paving.

Judkins neighborhood mowing and mulching.

Judkins neighborhood mowing and mulching.

While you’re out and about for a bike ride, in your car, on the bus, or just taking a stroll through your neighborhood, take a moment to appreciate how much natural beauty we have in our great city. SDOT crews will be out and about too, doing Spring maintenance and cleaning projects to keep our green spaces, streets, sidewalks and stairways tidy and accessible for all.

Goat-powered Vegetation Clearing in West Seattle!

Herd hard at work, they are goat-to team for this kind of work.

The Herd hard at work, they are the “goat-to” team for this kind of work.

Our Goat friends along with Head Herder and Chief Wrangler Tammy are back in action for SDOT to help clear some unwanted invasive Himalayan Blackberry and Japanese Knotweed from a West Seattle hillside stairway along SW Holden Street between Delridge Way SW and 20th Ave SW.

This an example of SDOT using “green” technology to support environmental stewardship.

Here’s a short video of Tammy sharing details about Franz and the Goat posse:

The Goats were happy to clear the brush, help deter some possible crime, and enjoyed some free breakfast, lunch and dinner. The weather was cloudy and rainy to start, but cleared later in the day so it wasn’t that baaaad. The goats took about four days to chew and ruminate, but didn’t overthink any of their work that went on around the clock.

Goats are waaay better suited to steep hillsides than humans, making it safer, more cost-effective and mutually beneficial to have this work done by goats than by humans.

The Goats even drew visitors who weren’t sheepish to say hello, and take photos for spreading the good work on social media.

Katie and Scott stopped by to check out Franz and posse doing their thing.

Katie and Scott stopped by to check out Franz and posse doing their thing.

The Goats have four stomachs, so they can eat and digest the blackberry (thorns and all), and knotweed without repopulating the seeds anywhere, meaning they aren’t spreading the plants elsewhere. The Herd cleared about 7,000 square feet of invasive vegetation making the stairway access safer for the neighborhood. We appreciate their “can-do” and “Goat-to” attitude; they’re happy, the neighbors that stopped by seemed happy, a win-win situation.

SDOT is Rolling in to May, Bike to Work Month!

 

May is Bike to Work Month. SDOT added a host of new bike facilities to Seattle’s already strong bicycling network in 2014. Our city has more lanes, trails, racks and signs than ever before, so now is your chance to join the ride. If you are a regular bike commuter, try to hit every day in May. And if you have never commuted in by bike before, why not use Bike to Work Month as an opportunity to give it a try? Seattle is a hilly city, so if looking find a route that has less incline, check out our Bike Map which can help sort out some routes for you to take.

Newly painted Bike Lane and BGT Leaning Rail

Newly painted Bike Lane and BGT Leaning Rail

Scott Kubly, SDOT’s Director challenged other city department directors this week and was joined by Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and Seattle Public Utilities Director Ray Hoffman to encourage all city staff to participate in Bike to Work Month.

SDOT Dir. Scott Kubly joind by Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and SPU Director Ray Hoffman at BTW Challenge

Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and SPU Director Ray Hoffman accepts SDOT Director Scott Kubly’s Bike to Work Month challenge.

We look forward to seeing you biking throughout the month of May enjoying a Spring ride. For Bike Share, Bikes on Buses and other useful links and resources please click here.

Seawall Habitat Shelves: Science and Urban Design

The seawall project has a variety of habitat enhancements demonstrating the city’s environmental stewardship efforts to improve the lost nearshore environment on Seattle’s waterfront. One of the key enhancement features is the introduction of habitat shelves – protruding shelves attached to the vertical wall face that will serve as the future home to marine life.

Installation of habitat shelves near Pier 57

This week, Seawall Project crews installed the first of these habitat shelves along the face of the new seawall near Pier 57.

Workers install stainless steel rods in the face of the seawall to support the new habitat shelves.

Workers install stainless steel rods in the face of the seawall to support the new habitat shelves.

Prior to installation, stainless steel threaded rods are inserted into the wall face to support the shelves, which can each weigh up to 2,685 pounds. The shelves are suspended by a crane, and then lowered into place and hung on the rods. The shelves are then bolted to the wall and grouted in place.  When the project is complete, 430 habitat shelves will be in place at various locations throughout the project area.

  Habitat shelves are installed in front of Pier 57. The cobbled surfaces promote growth of vegetation and marine invertebrates.


Habitat shelves are installed in front of Pier 57. The cobbled surfaces promote growth of vegetation and marine invertebrates.

The science behind the design

When developing the design for the habitat features of the new seawall, the City partnered with the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. Researchers with the university installed shelves and panels on the old seawall with several types of surface features and textures at various locations along the waterfront. They monitored the installation for four years, with the goal of identifying which designs provided the greatest benefit to habitat and could be incorporated into the new seawall.

Researchers from UW tested various shelf features over four years to determine which designs provided the best habitat development. Photo courtesy UW School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences.

Researchers from UW tested various shelf features over four years to determine which designs provided the best habitat development. Photo courtesy UW School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences.

The study found that features with high-relief elements, like shelves, had more mussels and algae present than did flat surfaces. In addition, the inclusion of cobbled texture, like those found on the new seawall face panels, appeared to encourage the recruitment of young mussels. Mussels and algae are known as “ecosystem engineers” because they provide additional refuge and food for a variety of small invertebrates that are important food sources for juvenile salmon and other small fish.

A computer-generated model of habitat shelves and face panels designed to enhance texture on the new seawall face. This is one of several textures that will be installed as part of the new seawall.

A computer-generated model of habitat shelves and face panels designed to enhance texture on the new seawall face. This is one of several textures that will be installed as part of the new seawall.

The findings from the study resulted in the design of the habitat shelves that were installed this week, and the cobble textures that have been incorporated into the new seawall face panels.

Learn more!

For more information about seawall construction, visit the Seawall Project website. If you have questions, email (seawall@waterfrontseattle.org) or call the 24-hour hotline (206.618.8584).

Chat with SDOT Director Scott Kubly to learn more and share your feedback on the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle

Join SDOT Director Scott Kubly for coffee and conversation in Fremont, Thursday afternoon:

 

Scott Kubly

Scott Kubly

Milstead & Co Coffee, 770 N 34th St  Thursday, 4/20, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a Calendar of Upcoming Events (calendar will continue to be updated):

  • 4/22/15 – Greater Duwamish Dist. Council 6:30 PM at Georgetown City Hall, 6202 13th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Southeast District Council 6:30 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Northwest District Council 7 PM at Greenwood Senior Center, 525 N 85th St
  • 4/23/15 – Coffee with Scott Kubly 1 – 2 PM at Milstead & Co Coffee, 770 N 34th St
  • 4/23/15 – Drop-in session 5 – 7 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/25/15 – U District Farmers Market 9 AM – 2 PM at University Way NE between 50th & 52nd
  • 4/26/15 – Fremont Sunday Market 10 AM – 5 PM at Corner of 3410 Evanston Ave North
  • 4/26/15 – Broadway Farmers Market 11 AM – 3 PM at Broadway Ave E and E Pine St
  • 4/26/15 – Ballard Farmers Market 10 AM – 3 PM at 5345 Ballard Ave NW
  • 4/26/15 – West Seattle Farmers Market 10 AM – 2 PM at California Ave SW & SW Alaska
  • 5/6/15 – Columbia City Farmers Market  3 – 7 PM at 37th Ave S and S Edmunds St

 

Mayor Murray announced a proposal last month for a nine-year, $900 million levy to replace the existing $365 million Bridging the Gap levy that expires at the end of 2015. The Transportation Levy to Move Seattle proposal focuses on taking care of the basics, maintaining our streets, bridges, and sidewalks, while also investing in the future with improvements that give us more transportation choices to move more people and goods in and around our growing city.

Mayor Murray announces Levy to Move Seattle

Since introducing the levy proposal, we’ve hosted three open houses in different parts of the city, and presented to numerous community and business organizations, as well as city advisory boards and commissions. We’ll continue these community briefings, and throughout April, will be hosting an additional round of opportunities for the public to learn about the proposal and provide feedback.

Share your input: Take this short survey to tell us what you think of the proposal and share your transportation priorities: www.moveseattlesurvey.com

http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/LevytoMoveSeattle.htm

 

12 New Streateries and Parklets Coming to Seattle

Nine streateries and three new parklets are coming soon to Seattle! In an exciting start for the new Streatery Pilot Program, nine local businesses will install a streatery near their establishments. They will be joined by three new parklets being sponsored by community and business groups.

SDOT Director Scott Kubly discusses new Streateries and Parklets

SDOT Director Scott Kubly discusses new Streateries and Parklets

Both the parklet and streatery programs let communities convert a small number of on-street parking spaces into usable public space. Streateries are like parklets except the sponsoring restaurant or bar can operate the space as a sidewalk café, providing space exclusively for their customers during their open hours of business. When the bar or restaurant is closed, the space will function as a parklet, open to everyone.

Three of the projects submitted will convert existing parklets to streateries—including Seattle’s first parklet at the Montana Bar on Capitol Hill. The others will create their spaces from scratch. Projects approved for 2015 are:

 

New Streateries:

Elysian Bar (converting a portion of the existing Chromer Parklet to a streatery), 1516 2nd Ave

Montana Bar (converting existing parklet to a streatery), 1506 E Olive Way

Comet Tavern and Lost Lake Lounge (converting existing parklet to streatery), 10th Ave and Pike St

Stoneburner, 5214 Ballard Ave NW

Mamnoon, 1508 Melrose Ave

Flowers Bar & Restaurant, 4247 University Way NE

Bottleneck Lounge, 2328 E Madison St

Guild 19th LLC (business not yet named), 600 19th Ave E

TnT Taqueria, 2114 N 45th St

 

New Parklets:

Community Arts Create, 4248 S Orcas St

Mighty-O Donuts, 1550 NW Market St

Sugar Plum, 324 15th Ave E

 

600 19th Avenue East location

600 19th Avenue East location

Though under different names depending on the city, parklets with café seating (our streateries) have become a popular way to support vibrant neighborhoods throughout North America. Portland, New York, San Jose and Montreal have implemented successful streatery-type programs.

Meanwhile, three previously approved parklets are about to open—in the Hillman City, Ballard and the Denny Triangle neighborhoods. That will bring the total number of completed Seattle parklets to nine—with three of those soon converting to streateries—and another five still in development. When fully built out there will be 14 parklets and nine streateries in Seattle.

For more on Streateries and Parklets:  http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/parklets.htm

Lake City Way Corridor Tree Planting

This past weekend, SDOT Urban Forestry celebrated Earth Day a few days early by planting 12 new trees in the median stretching between NE Northgate Way and NE 123rd Street. And, in addition to being a nod to Earth Day (April 22), these plantings are a part of the larger Lake City Way Traffic Safety Project, which launched in March 2014. As numerous studies have shown that people are less likely to speed, less likely to get in an accident, and feel lower levels of stress when driving on a tree-lined street, SDOT’s Landscape Architect’s office thought that new street trees might be just what this busy corridor needed.

But the benefits of Lake City’s new trees don’t stop at road safety – the environmental benefits are great as well. In the spring of 2014, Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) undertook the Thornton Creek Confluence Project, a project that aims to reduce pollutant runoff and flooding, and improve habitat in and around nearby Thornton Creek, part of which flows directly under Lake City Way. SDOT’s work in the median this past weekend will help SPU in these efforts. Once these new trees get established, they will intercept significant amounts of rainfall, thereby increasing the amount of water absorbed into the soil and evaporated back into the air, and reducing the amount of excess runoff making its way into Thornton Creek.

LCW Trees before

SDOT Urban Forestry crews prepping the planting site on Lake City Way.

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A few of the completed plantings. In total, eight ‘Patriot’ elms and four ‘Norwegian Sunset’ maples were planted.

Next weekend, SDOT crews will stretch this year’s Earth Day celebration into an “Earth Week” by planting 12 additional trees between 123rd Street and 133rd Street on Lake City Way – check back soon for more photos of the project!

Interested in getting involved with Earth Day yourself? Check out the official Earth Day website at www.earthday.org.

Chat with SDOT Director Scott Kubly to learn more and share your feedback on the Transportation Levy to Move Seattle

Join SDOT Director Scott Kubly for morning coffee and informal conversation in South Park or online Monday evening:

Scott Kubly

Scott Kubly

  • Via Vadi Caffèe, 8600 14th Ave. S  Monday, 4/20, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.
  • Online Meeting from 6 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. Please Register at

 

 

 

 

Here is a Calendar of Upcoming Events (calendar will continue to be updated):

  • 4/19/15 – West Seattle Farmers Market 10 AM – 2 PM at California Ave SW & SW Alaska
  • 4/20/15 – Online Open House 6 – 6:45 PM – Register online, see above.
  • 4/20/15 – Coffee with Scott Kubly 8 – 9 AM at Via Vadi Caffee, 8600 14th Avenue S
  • 4/21/15 – Seattle Freight Advisory Board 9:30 – 11:30 AM at Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue Rm. L-280
  • 4/22/15 – Greater Duwamish District Council 6:30 PM at Georgetown City Hall, 6202 13th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Southeast District Council 6:30 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/22/15 – Northwest District Council 7 PM at Greenwood Senior Center, 525 N 85th St
  • 4/23/15 – Coffee with Scott Kubly 1 – 2 PM at Milstead & Co Coffee, 770 N 34th St
  • 4/23/15 – Drop-in session 5 – 7 PM at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave S
  • 4/25/15 – U District Farmers Market 9 AM – 2 PM at University Way NE between 50th & 52nd
  • 4/26/15 – Fremont Sunday Market 10 AM – 5 PM at Corner of 3410 Evanston Ave North
  • 4/26/15 – Broadway Farmers Market 11 AM – 3 PM at Broadway Ave E and E Pine St
  • 4/26/15 – Ballard Farmers Market 10 AM – 3 PM at 5345 Ballard Ave NW
  • 4/26/15 – West Seattle Farmers Market 10 AM – 2 PM at California Ave SW & SW Alaska
  • 5/6/15 – Columbia City Farmers Market  3 – 7 PM at 37th Ave S and S Edmunds St

 

Mayor Murray announced a proposal last month for a nine-year, $900 million levy to replace the existing $365 million Bridging the Gap levy that expires at the end of 2015. The Transportation Levy to Move Seattle proposal focuses on taking care of the basics, maintaining our streets, bridges, and sidewalks, while also investing in the future with improvements that give us more transportation choices to move more people and goods in and around our growing city.

Mayor Murray announces Levy to Move Seattle

Mayor Murray announces Levy to Move Seattle

Since introducing the levy proposal, we’ve hosted three open houses in different parts of the city, and presented to numerous community and business organizations, as well as city advisory boards and commissions. We’ll continue these community briefings, and throughout April, will be hosting an additional round of opportunities for the public to learn about the proposal and provide feedback.

 

 

 

Share your input: Take this short survey to tell us what you think of the proposal and share your transportation priorities: www.moveseattlesurvey.com

http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/LevytoMoveSeattle.htm

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