New Holman Road NW Ped Median Gets Elmed!

So maybe elmed is not a word, but certainly the new Holman Road NW pedestrian median can now claim the elm treatment. SDOT Urban Forestry crews planted nine elm hybrids along the roadway this past weekend and into today. The trees are the finishing touches to the Holman Road NW Arterial Paving Project that completed construction in December (with large tree pits awaiting trees).

Holman Road NW New Pedestrian Median, with completed tree pits December 2014

Holman Road NW New Pedestrian Median, with completed tree pits, December 2014

Holman Road NW New Pedestrian Median, with planted trees, January 2015

Holman Road NW New Pedestrian Median, with planted trees, January 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Despite the new trees being barely five or so years old, each one weighed 600 pounds with its root ball–bark babies requiring heavy equipment and traffic control to ensure safe planting.

SDOT Urban Forestry crews install new hybrid Dutch elm trees along Holman Road NW

SDOT Urban Forestry crews install new hybrid elm trees along Holman Road NW

Seven of the new trees were installed in the long median that flanks the pedestrian overpass at 13th Avenue NW and one tree was planted in each of the other two short medians.

The trees are the crowning top to the new pedestrian median near 13th Avenue NW, across from Crown Hill Park. In the fall the leaves will turn a vivid golden hue.

Elm

Photo of established hybrid elm; inset: fall color

 

The new median is just one of the many pedestrian safety and accessibility improvements brought by the Holman Road NW Arterial Paving Project.

 

Providing an alternative crossing is important at this location as the nearby NW 92nd Street is a greenway and a future Safe Routes to School pathway at Mary Avenue (Whitman Middle School is just around the corner).

Looking southbound at Holman Avenue near 13th Avenue NW, fall 2014

Looking southbound at Holman Avenue near 13th Avenue NW, fall 2014

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Data shows cars slowdown in areas where there are street trees, making the neighborhood safer.

 

Yet another part of the Holman Project is discussion around removing the pedestrian bridge and replacing it with a pedestrian signal. That idea, which opens up the space for better sight lines, is still in need of funding.