Best of the Month | Launching the ‘Ride Now’ pilot program, centering equity in our Pedestrian Program, promoting work zone awareness, and more!

Two people walk around Green Lake Park in north Seattle. Photo: SDOT.

In case you missed it, we’re sharing highlights from the SDOT Blog each month. Here are some of our top blog posts from April.


SDOT Blog Monthly Highlights – April 2022 

  1. We’ve published an evaluation of the Seattle scooter share program – check it out and learn what’s next 
  1. New Ride Now program offers free and discounted rides to transit and other local trips for older adults (65+) and people with disabilities – learn more and find out if you qualify! 
  1. SDOT is conducting a racial equity analysis to ensure our Pedestrian Program meets the needs of everyone walking and rolling in Seattle 
  1. LEVY DOLLARS AT WORK | The Fairview Ave N Bridge has won two Public Works Project of the Year awards from the American Public Works Association! 
  1. National Work Zone Awareness Week: April 11-15, 2022 – help do your part by paying attention to signs and slowing down when you drive to and through work zones and incident response scenes 

Please note: You can click on the headlines to go directly to any specific blog post (#1-5) – or just read on for a shorter recap of each post and a photo. 

1) We’ve published an evaluation of the Seattle scooter share program – check it out and learn what’s next 

In April, we released our 2020-2021 Scooter Share Pilot Program Evaluation Report. The report showed clear demand for scooters as a convenient, low-emissions travel option. We plan to keep improving scooter accessibility, parking, and safety in Seattle. 

A Lime scooter in Gas Works Park.

A Lime scooter in Gas Works Park. Photo: SDOT. 

Our pilot program evaluation report detailed who uses scooter share equipment, where people ride scooters, common destinations for scooter rides, and more. We also wrote about next steps for the city’s scooter share program in May. You can read more about them here

2) New Ride Now program offers free and discounted rides to transit and other local trips for older adults (65+) and people with disabilities – learn more and find out if you qualify! 

We launched the Ride Now pilot program to provide free and discounted rides to transit stations and other nearby destinations to older adults (65+), people with disabilities, and their caregivers. The program is helping us plan more inclusive mobility support programs in the future. 

A person steps onto a bus on Delridge Way SW.

A person steps onto a bus on Delridge Way SW. Photo: SDOT. 

Through April and May, we’ve been providing vouchers for free and discounted rides to help eligible riders reach transit and other local destinations difficult to access through transit only. Created in partnership with King County Metro and community stakeholders, this voucher program is helping us explore more options to get people around Seattle. 

The Ride Now pilot program was made possible through a grant from Transit Planning 4 All. This national program works to help communities practice inclusive transit planning and in turn develop more accessible transit services and options. We’re collecting feedback through optional surveys of Ride Now participants to help us plan more inclusive, accessible mobility support services in the future. 

3) SDOT is conducting a racial equity analysis to ensure our Pedestrian Program meets the needs of everyone walking and rolling in Seattle 

We announced the kickoff of our Pedestrian Program Racial Equity Analysis. This evaluation will help us to better understand current pedestrian conditions and potential barriers to mobility for all people, so we can continue to improve our Pedestrian Program

Four people cross a street in Rainier Valley.

Four people cross the street in Rainier Valley. Photo: SDOT.

In line with Seattle’s 20-year Pedestrian Master Plan and the City’s commitments through the Race and Social Justice Initiative, we completed a Racial Equity Toolkit process to assess our Pedestrian Program. The Pedestrian Program Racial Equity Analysis is the next step to achieving our vision of Seattle as a place where all people can safely walk or roll to their destinations. Completed in collaboration with community members, the analysis will help us to identify ways we can help people of all backgrounds more easily and comfortably navigate their neighborhoods. 

4) LEVY DOLLARS AT WORK | The Fairview Ave N Bridge has won two Public Works Project of the Year awards from the American Public Works Association! 

Another big achievement for the Levy to Move Seattle was the recognition of the Fairview Ave N Bridge replacement project by the American Public Works Association. The new bridge is one of the most significant investments of your Levy dollars.

Two people enjoy views of Lake Union from the new Fairview Ave N Bridge.

Two people enjoy views of Lake Union from the new Fairview Ave N Bridge. Photo: SDOT. 

As part of the Levy to Move Seattle passed by voters in 2015, this nearly 80-year-old bridge was rebuilt and opened to the public in 2021 with improvements to safety and accessibility for all travelers. The new bridge features sidewalks on both sides of the street, a protected, 12-foot two-way bike lane, and a newly restored floating walkway along the water.  

The American Public Works Association is a nonprofit, international association of more than 30,000 members involved in public works. The bridge won the Association’s National Public Works Project of the Year award and the Washington State chapter Public Works Project of the Year award.  

The Levy to Move Seattle. Graphic: SDOT  

5) National Work Zone Awareness Week: April 11-15, 2022 – help do your part by paying attention to signs and slowing down when you drive to and through work zones and incident response scenes 

We recognized National Work Zone Awareness Week, and other agencies including the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) encouraged work zone awareness throughout the month of April, and beyond. Work zone awareness is a timely topic as construction continues in many parts of Seattle this summer. 

Two crew members replace a speed limit sign.

Two crew members replace a speed limit sign. Photo: SDOT. 

While April may be over, it’s always a good idea to pay attention and slow down as you drive through work zones to keep workers, yourself, and other travelers in the area safe. Thank you for your help to keep everyone safe while traveling in our city.