SR 520 Montlake Boulevard Sidewalk Closures

Rushing to catch the bus or just going for a stroll on Montlake Boulevard? Get ready for several sidewalk detours during the next six to eight weeks. Crews working for the Washington State Department of Transportation’s SR 520 West Approach Bridge North Project are getting ready to build wider, smoother sidewalks and new pedestrian islands along Montlake Boulevard East near SR 520. Work will occur in various locations along Montlake Boulevard East.

The work will take place in three sequential phases, described below. The first phase will begin as soon as Monday, March 2nd and each phase is expected to take two to three weeks to complete.

  • Phase 1: Sidewalk closed along the east side of Montlake Boulevard East to the north and south of East Hamlin Street.
  • Phase 2: Sidewalks closed at the northeast and southeast corners of the Montlake Boulevard East and East Lake Washington Boulevard intersection.
  • Phase 3: Sidewalks closed at the northwest and southwest corners of the Montlake Boulevard East and East Lake Washington Blvd intersection. The crosswalk across the westbound on-ramp to SR 520 will also be closed at this time.

 

The graphic below illustrates the locations of the closure during Phase 1 and some common pedestrian detours to avoid them. For those who can handle stairs, the stairs leading to the SR 520 freeway transit stop can serve as a shortcut when the crosswalks at the Montlake Boulevard East and East Lake Washington Blvd intersection are inaccessible.

SR 520 Sidewalk Detours Map

SR 520 Sidewalk Detours Map

To get the most current information about the current construction activities check out the What’s Happening Now? site for the SR 520 – West Approach Bridge North Project.

Happy Lunar New Year! Seattle Streetcar Stations Highlight Cultural Heritage of Chinatown-International District

Spring arrived early in Chinatown-International District this week! Just in time for Lunar New Year, three Seattle Streetcar stations sprouted bold flowers and graceful icons symbolizing the neighborhood’s cultures:

  •  5th & Jackson, Japantown – Cherry Blossom symbolizes the ephemeral nature of life; Daruma doll represents good luck in reaching a goal, Koi fish symbolizes good fortune, and Crane signifies good fortune and longevity.
5th and Jackson Street Station - Cherry Blossom

5th and Jackson Street Station – Cherry Blossom

  • 7th & Jackson, Chinatown – Chrysanthemum is native to China; Bat symbolizes good luck, LionDog wards off evil spirits, and medallion represents good fortune.
7th and Jackson Street Station - Chrysanthemum

7th and Jackson Street

7th and Jackson Street

7th and Jackson Street Station – Chrysanthemum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • 12th & Jackson, Little Saigon – Hoa Mai flower is popular in Vietnam during Lunar New Year; Tiger represents stability and strength, Ox means good luck and good health, and Turtle symbolizes heaven and earth.
13th and Jackson

13th and Jackson Street Station – Hoa Mai flower

 

13th and Jackson Station - Hoa Mai flower

13th and Jackson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Local design firm TMarks Design created these colorful graphics in collaboration with local business owners, residents and SDOT. The station installations are one of the more visible steps toward the start of service on the First Hill Streetcar Line, a new urban mobility option funded through Sound Transit’s “ST2” mass transit expansion plan.

The First Hill Streetcar will support economic growth and strengthen connections among the places where people live, work and socialize. It will be an important link in the regional transit system, and will connect the diverse and vibrant residential neighborhoods and business districts of Capitol Hill, First Hill, Yesler Terrace, Central Area, Chinatown ID and Pioneer Square. The first completed car for the new line is expected to be delivered to the Streetcar Operations & Maintenance Facility on February 27. After delivery, components removed for shipping will be re-installed, and all of the systems will be re-tested before the car is approved for testing on city streets. See www.seattlestreetcar.org for regular updates on the streetcar start-up process.

Meetings Set for Rainier Avenue S Road Safety Corridor Project

Rainier Postcard (2)

Residents living in the vicinity of Rainier Avenue S will receive the postcard (pictured above) inviting them to Design Alternatives Review meetings for this road safety corridor project. More than 1200 collisions have occurred on Rainier since 2011 resulting in 630 injuries and two fatalities. SDOT has developed several different engineering options to improve safety for all modes on Rainier. Please join us to review and to provide feedback into these options.

Here are the details:

Thursday, Feb. 26, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Columbia School – Cafeteria/Commons, 3528 S Ferdinand St (please use the South Edmunds St entrance and parking area)

Tuesday, Mar. 3, from 6 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the Ethiopian Community Center, 8323 Rainier Ave S

The input you provide will help shape the direction of our work. Be sure to check out the excellent data about the corridor on our website prior to the meetings to familiarize yourself with the issues.

And to see what we’ve done on other road safety corridors, follow these links:

NE 75th Street Road Safety Corridor

Lake City Way Traffic Safety Corridor

SDOT Safety Programs

City of Seattle Seeks Proposals for Coordinated Street Furniture Program

The Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) is seeking to improve the streetscapes of downtown Seattle and South Lake Union, and has issued a request for proposals (RFP) for a Coordinated Street Furniture Program. The program’s goal is to enhance the public right of way through high quality street furniture and a higher level of maintenance while also improving pedestrian circulation and safety.

Qualified companies are invited to offer their proposals for the design, fabrication, supply, installation, operation, maintenance and repair of coordinated street furniture located in the public right of way in downtown Seattle and South Lake Union.

The City expects the Coordinated Street Furniture Program will provide:

Kiosk Example elsewhere - (not intended to represent design or potential advertising in Seattle).

Kiosk Example elsewhere – (not intended to represent design or potential advertising in Seattle).

  • An enhanced public realm experience for pedestrians, transit riders and visitors.
  • Improved comfort and usability of public gathering spaces, transit stops and stations, and public information systems, such as wayfinding.
  • A new variety of publicly accessible facilities and removal of “clutter” in the public realm.
  • Ongoing maintenance and cleanliness of all street furnishings in the program and areas around those furnishings.
  • A share of created advertising revenue to support further streetscape enhancements, center city transportation projects, safety upgrades or other needs.

 
The Coordinated Street Furniture Program may include, but is not limited to, transit shelters, informational kiosks, consolidated refuse receptacles and seating elements. If approved by the Seattle City Council, limited advertising may be permitted on selected street furniture.

Information Kiosk example elsewhere - not intended to represent design or potential advertising in Seattle.

Information Kiosk example elsewhere – (not intended to represent design or potential advertising in Seattle).

Transit Shelter Example elsewhere - (not intended to represent design or potential advertising in Seattle).

Transit Shelter Example elsewhere – (not intended to represent design or potential advertising in Seattle).

 

The program would provide new street furnishings and amenities in downtown Seattle and South Lake Union in addition to direct revenue to the City. The program vendor would maintain the furnishings as well as the streetscapes surrounding them, which would generate cost savings for the city and, possibly, for King County Metro as well. A coordinated street furniture program has the potential to generate $4-7 million of new revenue annually.

As part of this program, the City seeks exceptional design quality that complements the urban environment, functionality of the elements, and safe and accessible placement of street furniture. All elements of the Coordinated Street Furniture Program will occupy public space and will be maintained and serviced by the successful vendor. The full request for proposal can be found at:  http://thebuyline.seattle.gov/.

One more day to add your Madison Corridor Transit Study Input

One more day to add your input by taking SDOT’s online survey for the Madison Corridor Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Study, the survey ends February 5th. 

The Study is developing a concept design for BRT from Colman Dock to Martin Luther King Jr. Way and will examine two alternatives to evaluate travel-time savings, traffic impacts, ridership projections, and parking impacts in the coming months.

Madison Street facing west.

Madison Street facing west.

The 2.1-mile corridor runs from Colman Dock east to 23rd Avenue and will improve access to ferries, Third Avenue transit, First Hill medical facilities and housing, Seattle University, the Central district, Link Light Rail, and the First Hill Streetcar.

Madison Street Cooridor Map

Madison Street Cooridor Map

You can request paper copies of the survey directly from SDOT, by emailing MadisonBRT@seattle.gov or contacting Sara Walton at 206-386-4645.

For more information on the Madison BRT study, visit the project website.

Plan Ahead for Sunday’s Big Game

Seattle’s abuzz with football excitement as the Seahawks look to make history in Phoenix this Sunday.

On this final Blue Friday of the season, we present you with some critical information so you can plan ahead if you plan to drink. It’s common knowledge that drinking and driving don’t mix. Consider these travel options as you put together your game plan for the big day:

  • Get a ride – Take the bus, rail, a cab or a service like Uber, Lyft, Curbed or Flywheel to get around town. Let a professional driver escort you between the party and your home.
  • Select a Designated Driver – Make sure someone stays sober if driving is necessary. Driving impaired is one sure-fire way to ruin a momentous occasion.
  • Park it – If you accidentally consume some “special brownies” at the party, leave your car parked overnight and sleep it off at a friends house. Everything you need to know about pre-paid parking can be found here.
  • Walk safe – Walking impaired is no party. Be sure you’re sober enough to navigate our busy urban streets before heading out solo. If you don’t have your wits about you, have a sober friend help you get to your destination or just sleep it off.

 

We hope everyone has a safe and fun weekend! GO HAWKS!

Let's hope we get to do this again next week!

Let’s hope we get to do this again next week!

 

Mercer Corridor Project – Maintaining Safety through the Corridor

Travelers who use the Mercer Corridor have much to look forward to as construction is expected to wrap-up later this year. As pavement is poured, lanes are added, sidewalks poured, bike lanes completed and signal timing adjusted, SDOT will maintain its commitment to safety to all those who work, live and travel in the corridor. Though traffic capacity is limited, the project opened two new westbound lanes between Ninth Ave N and Queen Anne Ave N last summer. This provides a much improved, direct route from I-5 to Seattle Center, Uptown and Queen Anne, and it also eliminates some of the challenges between turning vehicles and pedestrians.

Bicycle and Pedestrian route

Bicycle and Pedestrian route

Work in the past six months has focused on Mercer between Fifth Ave N and Ninth Ave N, and south along Fifth Ave N. Installation of new signals, sidewalks, and accessible ramps has required that traffic lanes, sidewalks, and crosswalks be closed to protect pedestrians and others from construction activities. Pedestrians have had to cross the street at signalized intersections and sometimes travel two or three blocks out of their way to avoid the construction zones. This is inconvenient, but necessary to maintain safe, accessible connections during construction. Pedestrian maps highlighting closures and detour routes are posted on our project website as well as on sidewalks in the project area. Here’s a link: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/mercercorridor.htm

Mercer St Pedestrian Detour map

Mercer St Pedestrian Detour map

As work progresses, more corners and crosswalks are opening up with improved ramps and sidewalks. All new sidewalks and curbs are constructed to meet the current Americans with Disabilities Act standards for mobility providing safe travels for all users in the corridor.

Work will continue near the intersection of Dexter Ave N and Mercer St where temporary configurations have been in place on both streets since July of last year. Temporary roadways were constructed so that crews could safely work on major utility relocations on both Mercer St and Dexter Ave N. Both roadways and corresponding curvatures drivers experience will be removed this year, starting with Mercer St the weekend of February 7.

Removing the bridge over Broad St at the intersection of Mercer St and Dexter Ave N

Removing the bridge over Broad St at the intersection of Mercer St and Dexter Ave N

During this weekend closure, crews will also stripe the eastbound lanes with their final markings. Pedestrians will also experience a noticeable change in their routing as the temporary roadways are removed. Following the February 7 weekend closure, pedestrians will be moved from the south side of Mercer St to new sidewalks on the north side of Mercer St between 5th Ave N and Dexter Ave N. The new separated bicycle path will be in place adjacent to the sidewalk, but crews will wait for drier weather to add channelization markings on the bike path.

Do You take Transit on Madison Street? Your input is greatly appreciated.

Do you take Transit on Madison Street? SDOT has a new online survey and is seeking input for the Madison Corridor Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Study.

The Study is developing a concept design for BRT from Colman Dock to Martin Luther King Jr. Way and will examine two alternatives to evaluate travel-time savings, traffic impacts, ridership projections, and parking impacts in the coming months.

SONY DSC

Route 12 Bus on Madison Street

The 2.1-mile corridor runs from Colman Dock east to 23rd Avenue and will improve access to ferries, Third Avenue transit, First Hill medical facilities and housing, Seattle University, the Central district, Link Light Rail, and the First Hill Streetcar.

Madison Street Cooridor Map

Madison Street Cooridor Map

SDOT is seeking input on key elements before this analysis begins, including transit connections, routing options, station locations, and an alternate bike facility.  After the analysis is complete, SDOT will launch a round of outreach to share the results and discuss community preferences about the design options. The last question of the survey is a map exercise; don’t forget to share your map. #MadisonBRT

The survey ends February 5th.  You can request paper copies of the survey directly from SDOT, by emailing MadisonBRT@seattle.gov or contacting Sara Walton at 206-386-4645.

For more information on the Madison BRT study, visit the project website.

Battery Drive System Impresses in First Tests of New Streetcars

The first performance tests of the new streetcars on order for the First Hill Streetcar line were completed in December. In addition to testing acceleration and braking, the performance tests featured off-wire operation powered by a rechargeable battery system, known as the On-Board Energy Storage System (OESS). When operating on the First Hill Streetcar line, the streetcars will be powered by the OESS on each inbound trip from Capitol Hill to Pioneer Square (2.5 miles). The batteries will be recharging whenever the streetcar is braking, and will also recharge on the outbound trip from Pioneer Square to Capitol Hill, while being powered from the overhead wires (known as the Overhead Contact System, or OCS).

Czech Streetcar Test

Street Car Battery drive testing in Czech Republic.

Street Car Map

Initial tests were performed on a test track at the factory where the first streetcar was completed in the Czech city of Ostrava. The streetcar operated off-wire for 3 miles, using 25% of the battery capacity of the OESS. Subsequent tests were performed on the Ostrava streetcar system. This allowed for uphill and downhill operation and simulation of traffic conditions that may be encountered in Seattle. During this testing, the streetcar operated on battery drive for distances as great as four miles and durations as long as 37 minutes. The testing also demonstrated that batteries recharge rapidly from regenerative braking and during operation on the OCS.

The test results indicate that the OESS will be more than adequate for the requirements of the First Hill line, and can also be used for significant segments of the planned Center City Connector streetcar extension.

Streetcar Battery drive testing in Czech Republic.

Streetcar Battery drive testing in Czech Republic.

The OESS was developed for the First Hill Streetcar to reduce overhead wire conflicts with the Metro trolley bus system. Several other cities plan to use battery drive to avoid overhead conflicts (such as bridge overpasses), save energy costs, or limit the visual impact of overhead contact systems. A similar system has been in use in Nice, France since 2007.

For more information, please follw link: http://www.seattlestreetcar.org/

Seattle Streetcar March 2015 Fare Changes

In March 2015, Seattle Streetcar plans to change fares for consistency with Link light rail service fares. StreetCar PixThis will make the experience more consistent across transit services. This change will occur in coordination with Sound Transit and King County Metro fare changes planned for March 2015. It will align streetcar fares with new Link base fares planned for March 2015, offer the new Low Income Adult fare to Seattle Streetcar customers, and offer a more robust day pass option. Public comments on the proposed fare changes can be submitted through February 9th and will be considered before implementation. Fill out the Online Comment Form! 

This table summarizes the proposed Seattle Streetcar fares planned to go into effect in March 2015:

  Current Fares Proposed Fares3
Adult $2.50 $2.25
Youth $1.25 (6-17 years old) $1.50 (6-18 years old)
Senior(65+)/Regional Reduced Fare Permit (RRFP)1 $0.75 $1.00
Low Income Adult2 Not available $1.50
Children 5 and under Free Free
Day Pass $5.00(bulk sales only) Adult: $4.50Youth: $3.00Senior/RRFP: $2.00

 

1 Regional Reduced Fare Permit (RRFP), available to qualifying persons with disabilities or seniors.

2 Available to qualifying adult riders with incomes at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. To qualify, a household of four would have an annual household income at or below $47,700.

3 Day passes and single ride paper tickets will only be valid on Seattle Streetcar, transfers only possible with an ORCA card. The new day pass options will not be available until new ticket vending machines, scheduled for phased installation in Spring 2015, are in operation.

 

Learn more and comment:

Comments due by February 9, 2015

Fill out the ONLINE COMMENT FORM!

Visit: www.seattlestreetcar.org/farechange.htm

 

Attend: Public meeting on February 2, 2015

5 – 7 PM, presentation at 6 PM

Seattle City Hall, Room L280

600 Fourth Ave

Seattle WA 98104

Email:    seattle.streetcar@seattle.gov

Mail:      Seattle Department of Transportation

Attn Ayelet Ezran

PO Box 34996

Seattle, WA 98124-4996

 

To request interpretation or accommodations, please contact Ayelet Ezran (206-733-9032 or ayelet.ezran@seattle.gov) at least five business days before the meeting.