Move Seattle Wins in ST3

Voters in the Puget Sound region recently approved Sound Transit 3 (ST3), the $54 billion plan to fund light rail, commuter trains and bus-rapid transit.

While most of the attention was focused on 62 miles of light rail that will be added to our growing network (Seattle to Ballard and West Seattle), there are some early wins in the plan for the Levy to Move Seattle.

The approved funding package includes $65 million to improve speed and reliability of existing transit service in Seattle. $35 million will be dedicated to improving Seattle’s Rapid Ride C and D Lines. SDOT will work closely with Metro and Sound Transit to construct roadway, traffic signal and other improvements to both of these high ridership corridors.

The remaining $30 million of the funding will provide critical matching funds for the Madison Street Bus Rapid Transit project, another Move Seattle commitment and one of the seven future Rapid Ride corridors that will be constructed during the life of the 9-year levy.st3

ST3 also includes funding for a new light rail station at Graham Street in Southeast Seattle. The Levy to Move Seattle included $10 million to help build this important station and passage of the ST3 package will make this a reality for residents and commuters in this neighborhood. Additionally, ST3 includes funding for a station at 130th to improve light rail access in North Seattle.st3-2

ST3 also includes several million dollars for improved station access at our existing light rail stations to make them safer for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists. SDOT will be working with Sound Transit to identify and construct these projects and we will keep you updated as the planning for ST3 work progresses.

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Moving More People Through Transportation Equity

More than 200 people turned out for a kickoff event to launch our Transportation Equity Program in partnership with Seattle Housing Authority (SHA). This event was part of a new initiative to promote transportation equity by helping people of all incomes access a full range of transportation options, such as ORCA LIFT cards, car sharing memberships and car tab rebates, among other resources.

20161118_174923The event was at the Rainier Vista housing community where we distributed:

It was a diverse crowd – people spoke a variety of languages including Vietnamese, Somali, Amharic, and English. Thank you to the Public Outreach and Engagement Liaisons through the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods for offering interpretation services. Hopelink was also there to show residents hands-on training on how to use ORCA cards.

We will continue working with SHA to plan similar events at New Holly, Yesler Terrace, and other SHA residential properties.

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The New 2016-2017 Winter Weather Brochure and Snow Route Maps are here!

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SDOT’s annual Winter Weather brochure has a large map of Seattle’s snow and ice routes, lists important telephone numbers and web sites to use during winter storms, and offers preparedness tips. Here’s a link to our Winter Weather page that has useful information about what to expect when it snows.

During major winter storms, plan your trip by seeing where the snow plows have been and viewing traffic cameras by clicking on the link below:
Winter Weather Response Map

The brochures will be free at Seattle Public Library branches and Neighborhood Service Centers.

This year we will again distribute the brochure to elementary schools in the Seattle public school district for children to take home to their parents.

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Download only the map in English

Download the full brochure in:

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SDOT Mobility Innovations First Forum on Mobility Hubs

SDOT hosted the first Mobility Innovations Forum Monday, the topic Mobility Hubs.

We’re hosting a speaker series on mobility innovations, running through mid-2017 (see below)

The City of Seattle is partnering with transit agencies and private mobility services to develop a network of shared mobility hubs throughout the city, providing better mobility and integrated transportation choices for all. Topics will include mobility hubs, smart mobility strategies for high growth in Seattle, preparing for autonomous vehicles, and making shared transportation equitable.

Scott Kubly, Director of Seattle Department of Transportation; Seleta Reynolds, General Manager of Los Angeles DOT; David Bragdon, Executive Director of TransitCenter; Sharon Feigon, Executive Director at the Shared Use Mobility Center, discussed their thoughts on mobility hubs as Ross Reynolds from KUOW, moderated the conversation.

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Scott Kubly, SDOT Dir; Speakers: Seleta Reynolds; David Bragdon; Sharon Feigon; Ross Reynolds KUOW.

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Scott Kubly , SDOT Dir. addresses attendees alongside featured guests.

Here’s a definition of what Mobility Hubs are:

Mobility hubs provide an integrated suite of transportation services, supporting amenities, and urban design enhancements that reduce the need for single occupant vehicle trips by increasing first mile/last mile access to high-frequency transit stations. Mobility hubs are places of connectivity where different modes of transportation such as walking, biking, ride-sharing, and public transit, cometogether seamlessly at concentrations of employment, housing, shopping, and/ or recreation.

Hub features can include: bikeshare, car share, neighborhood electric vehicles, bike parking, dynamic parking management strategies, real-time traveler information, real-time ride-sharing, demand-based shuttle, bicycle and pedestrian facility improvements, wayfinding, urban design enhancements, and supporting systems like mobile applications, electric vehicle charging, smart intersections, and a universal payment system to make it easy to access a wide range of travel options.

Please join us at the upcoming forums. More details will be posted, we appreciate your participation in the months ahead.

The preliminary schedule for future topics is:

  • January: Smart mobility strategies for high growth Seattle
  • March: Preparing for connected and autonomous vehicles
  • May: Making shared mobility equitable
  • June or July: Rethinking mobility as a service

Questions, please contact Evan Corey: evan.corey@seattle.gov.

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SDOT Mobility Innovations Forum Monday, November 14 at 6 p.m.

SDOT is hosting a speaker series on mobility innovations, running through mid-2017. 

Please join us at the first event on Monday, November 14. The City of Seattle is partnering with transit agencies and private mobility services to develop a network of shared mobility hubs throughout the city, providing better mobility and integrated transportation choices for all. Topics will include mobility hubs, smart mobility strategies for high growth in Seattle, preparing for autonomous vehicles, and making shared transportation equitable.

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Topic: Mobility Hubs
When: November 14, 6:00 PM
Where: Seattle Art Museum (Pletscheeff Auditorium) 1300 1st Ave
Free with RSVP: https://sdot-mobilityinnovations.eventbrite.com

Speakers include:

  • Scott Kubly, Director of Seattle Department of Transportation
  • Seleta Reynolds, General Manager of Los Angeles DOT
  • David Bragdon, Executive Director of TransitCenter
  • Sharon Feigon, Executive Director at the Shared Use Mobility Center
  • Ross Reynolds from KUOW will moderate the conversation.

The preliminary schedule for future topics is:

  • January: Smart mobility strategies for high growth Seattle
  • March: Preparing for connected and autonomous vehicles
  • May: Making shared mobility equitable
  • June or July: Rethinking mobility as a service

Learn about this effort, similar efforts throughout North America, and how mobility hubs can transform the travel experience in the future.

Questions, please contact Evan Corey: evan.corey@seattle.gov.

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How do the Fremont and Ballard Bridge Openings work? (Updated)

Here’s an updated and shortened Blog Video of our behind-the-scenes look at the Fremont and Ballard Bridge openings, and how they work:

(Click on HD in Settings to view in High Definition)

 

SDOT operates and maintains over 149 bridges throughout Seattle, including four movable bridges. Three of SDOT’s movable bridges are draw bridges, known as bascule bridges. These are the Ballard Bridge, Fremont Bridge and University Bridge.

The city is required to open the bridges to marine traffic when requested, but is allowed to restrict boat and marine traffic openings during the morning
(7-9 a.m.) and afternoon (4-6 p.m.) commutes on weekdays (except national holidays). The openings average about four minutes, from stopping traffic to letting traffic resume. SDOT appreciates the public’s patience during the openings as marine traffic passes through.

The Ballard Bridge, located at the west end of the Lake Washington Ship Canal at Salmon Bay, is the fourth and last of the Lake Washington Ship Canal Bridges to be passed before entering Puget Sound from Lake Washington. Built in 1917 with a length of 2,854 feet, the Ballard Bridge links the Magnolia and Queen Anne neighborhoods with Ballard.

The Fremont Bridge crosses the Lake Washington Ship Canal and connects the Fremont and Queen Anne neighborhoods. The bridge opened on July 4, 1917, it is the only blue and orange bridge operated by SDOT. The Fremont Bridge’s current color was chosen by a 1985 poll taken among Fremont residents and the Fremont Arts Council.

The Fremont Bridge also connects the Lake Washington Ship Canal Trail to the Burke Gilman Trail and has one of Seattle’s nine bike counters (here’s our previous blog about the Fremont Bridge Bike Counter and how it works). The Fremont Bridge has celebrated over 610,000 openings and counting as of January 2016. The bridge sits just 30 feet above the water, and rises for marine traffic on average of about 35 times a day, making it as one of the busiest bascule bridges in the world.

Here’s a link to our SDOT Bridges page: http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/bridges.htm

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SDOT at the Mount Baker Hub Fest!

The Mount Baker Hub Festival celebrated the transformation of that community with music, food, and fun last weekend at the Sound Transit Link Station and ArtSpace Plaza.

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SDOT had a table at the event and we shared information on our Accessible Mount Baker project that will engage and interact with the community to better understand how the existing transportation system functions and how it can be most readily improved.

The project identifies safety improvements for the community near the Link light rail station and the intersection of Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Rainer Avenue. A second project outcome is the development of a long-range integrated multimodal plan for the Mount Baker Town Center.

While there were several participating agencies, many resources and a lot of important information, there was also plenty of fun at Hub Fest, including local vendors, live music, artists and performers. About 400 people showed up to this fun community event!

Hub Fest was presented by the Mount Baker Hub Business Association, sponsored by SouthEast Effective Development; and Friends of Mount Baker Town Center, sponsored by the Seattle Parks Foundation.

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Commuting During Summer Construction

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Construction site in Seattle.

Seattle is one of the fastest growing cities in the nation right now, which means more construction projects, cars, and crowds as we share our streets with people on everything from zero to sixteen wheels.

Summer is a great time to try an alternate commute method, such as biking or taking the bus, but it’s also peak season for road and sidewalk maintenance. The rainy season can cause delays and difficulty on construction and repairs, so projects are trying to complete work while the sun is still shining.

All this can make commuting tricky, but we’re here to help.

 

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Seattle Mayor Ed Murray and SDOT Intern Ahlaam Ibraahim at a recent Vision Zero event.

Our Vision Zero team is hard at work to end traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2030 through educational outreach like the above event, and coordinating enforcement of traffic safety laws with the Seattle Police Department. Our Levy to Move team is implementing the taxpayer approved $930 million 9 year plan to improve safety for all travelers, maintain our streets and bridges, and invest in reliable, affordable travel options for a growing city.

And, through our All Aboard partnership with King County Metro, we’re improving or expanding 85% of the bus routes in Seattle.

We’re working hard to make it easier to get around Seattle, but it’s likely you won’t be able to avoid work zones completely as our city continues to grow.

Please be patient and cautious around construction, and remember, your fellow travelers – whether they be in cars, on bikes or buses – are also navigating the same obstacles.

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Enjoy Your Seafair Weekend!

Seafair Weekend is one of the biggest, busiest weekends of the summer in Seattle and that means a LOT of people will be out and about – it’s a good time to remind people to look out for others when heading out for summertime activities.

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Whether you’re hopping a bus to the waterfront to tour a US Navy ship, biking to a friend’s waterfront home to watch the Blue Angels or packing up the family to drive down to Genessee Park to catch the hydros, here are a few reminder safety tips:

Allow Enough Time to Reach Your Destination

Plan your trip and be sure to allow enough time to get where you’re going. That usual 30 minutes to get downtown will take longer than normal because thousands of others are headed that way as well! Speeding can lead to trouble. So please slow down and be courteous.

Plan Ahead if You Plan to Partake

Help keep our streets safe by not driving while under the influence of alcohol – which remains the single biggest contributing factor to traffic fatalities – or marijuana. As part of our Vision Zero campaign, we are partnering with rideshare services Uber and Lyft to give you options for safe rides home this Seafair weekend and beyond.

Keep Your Eyes on the Road

Your phone will likely be pinging you all day long while you plan your weekend. There’s no need to check it while you’re behind the wheel (1, 2 or 4 wheels). Whether you’re driving, walking, or biking, we recommend that you focus on the road instead of other things.

Stop for Pedestrians

We are having an amazing stretch of weather (which doesn’t always happen during Seafair) and that brings more people outdoors, everywhere. As drivers, always be watchful, courteous, and remember to stop for pedestrians. Don’t forget to wave!

Headed down to Genessee Park for Seafair? Check out the map below to see which streets are closed and where parking has been restricted.2016_Seafair_StreetParking_Map newHave a fantastic Seafair Weekend!

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Madison Street Bus Rapid Transit Design Input Open House Dates: August 3, 4, 9  

Please join SDOT at upcoming open houses to learn more about Madison Street Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), which will begin construction in 2018. SDOT has worked closely with the community to design Madison Street BRT and is continuing to seek community input. Madison Street BRT will provide high-frequency, fast, reliable, and safe public transportation between First Ave and Madison Valley.

At the open houses, the public is encouraged to speak with SDOT staff and provide feedback on the updated design, including roadway and station designs, along with access improvements planned along the corridor. Open house dates are:

  • Wednesday, August 3 

5-7 p.m.

Seattle University, Campion Ballroom

914 E Jefferson St

  • Thursday, August 4

11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Town Hall

1119 8th Ave

  • Tuesday, August 9

5-7 p.m.

Meredith Mathews East Madison YMCA

1700 23rd Ave

 

To give feedback online, visit MadisonBRT.participate.online from August 2-16.

Madison Street BRT will serve the Downtown, First Hill, Capitol Hill, Central Area, and Madison Valley neighborhoods. The project will improve transit access on the corridor, especially for neighborhoods south of Madison Street that may have fewer transit options.

Madison Street BRT is the first of seven new RapidRide lines to be delivered in Seattle as part of the voter-approved Levy to Move Seattle. Service on Madison Street is anticipated to begin in 2019.

Find out more about Madison Street BRT at http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/MadisonBRT.htm.

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